Obstetrics/Gynecology and Pediatrics  |   November 2020
Somatic Dysfunctions of Hip and Pelvis Overlooked in a Case of Vulvodynia
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Osteopathic Medicine (Dr Giovanis) and the Department of Primary Care (Dr Zeszutek) at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in Middletown, New York. 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Athina Giovanis, DO, Department of Osteopathic Medicine at Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine 60 Prospect Ave, Room 203, Middletown, NY 10940-4133. Email: athina.giovanis@touro.edu
     
Article Information
Obstetrics/Gynecology and Pediatrics   |   November 2020
Somatic Dysfunctions of Hip and Pelvis Overlooked in a Case of Vulvodynia
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, November 2020, Vol. 120, 792-795. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.140
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, November 2020, Vol. 120, 792-795. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.140
Abstract

Vulvodynia is chronic perineal pain in women. Repercussions of this disorder can have a negative effect on women's health and lifestyle. The origin is often multifactorial, including pelvic and lower extremity somatic dysfunctions. If left untreated, these somatic dysfunctions can directly alter ligamentous tension on the pelvic floor and surrounding regions, resulting in perineal pain. Management of vulvodynia must be individualized due to the multifactorial etiology and complicated structure and function of the pelvic floor muscles. The authors present a case of vulvodynia in which osteopathic manipulative treatment was an effective management technique.

Subscribe to view more

For full access to this article, log in to an existing user account, purchase an annual subscription, or purchase a short-term subscription.

Order a subscription

Subscribe

Pay Per View

Entire Journal
30-Day Access

$50.00

Buy Now

This Issue
7-Day Access

$25.00

Buy Now

This article
24-Hour Access

$10.00

Buy Now

Sign In Or Create an account

Please sign in using your Osteopathic.org login.
If you do not have an AOA login, you may create a new account.

Or Subscribe