Review  |   September 2020
Time-Restricted Feeding and Potential for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Narrative Review
Author Notes
  • From Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Vallejo, California (Student Doctor Lustig and Dr Shubrook) and Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, East Lansing, Michigan (Dr Pfotenhauer). 
  • Disclaimer: Dr Shubrook, a JAOA associate editor, was not involved in the editorial review or decision to publish this article. 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Elijah Lustig, OMS II, 1314 Court St, Alameda, CA 94501-4725 Email: elustig1995@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Endocrinology / Diabetes
Review   |   September 2020
Time-Restricted Feeding and Potential for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Narrative Review
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 2020, Vol. 120, 560-567. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.101
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 2020, Vol. 120, 560-567. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.101
Abstract

Intermittent fasting (IF) is an increasingly popular strategy for weight loss and improved metabolic health. IF regimes involve deliberate implementation of fasting windows ranging from 12 to 72 hours. During these fasting windows, individuals reduce their caloric intake by 75% to 100%. Such strategies show promise and are increasingly socially popular, but many effects are not completely understood. Specifically, the effects of time-restricted feeding (TRF), a specific form of IF in which participants undergo daily fasting periods lasting about 16 hours, is among the most popular yet under-studied regimens. This review finds that TRF may produce mild weight loss and improved function of insulin. TRF also likely produces cardiovascular effects, such as decreased blood pressure and fasting blood triglycerides. TRF, like other forms of IF, may encourage fat loss specifically when combined with exercise. The manuscripts identified in this narrative literature review were analyzed for the potential benefit for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus, and limitations of summarized content were noted. While these studies support some suspected benefits of TRF, they also legitimize the need for future TRF studies, since conclusions are greatly limited by a paucity of evidence.

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