Online First
Clinical Images  |   August 2020
Primary familial brain calcification
Author Notes
  • From the Departments of Neurology (Drs Parasram and Sarva) and Radiology (Dr Chazen) at Weill Cornell Medicine in New York, New York.  
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported.  
  • Support: None reported.  
  •  *Address correspondence to Melvin Parasram, DO, MS, Weill Cornell Medicine, Department of Neurology, 520 E 70th St, Starr Pavilion 607, New York, NY 10021-9800. Email: mep9801@nyp.org
     
Article Information
Imaging / Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Clinical Images
Clinical Images   |   August 2020
Primary familial brain calcification
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Published Online First on August 7, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.116
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Published Online First on August 7, 2020. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.116
A 61-year-old woman presented with recurrent falls, worsening gait, and dysarthria. She was given a diagnosis of primary familial brain calcification (PFBC), or Fahr disease, 3 years prior after developing gait difficulty, declining motor function, and dysarthria. Prior noncontrast computed tomography of the head revealed bilateral and symmetric basal ganglia calcifications. An extensive workup revealed no secondary causes of intracranial calcifications. Carbidopa-levodopa was ineffective. Examination demonstrated poor recall, dysarthria, right arm spasticity, left arm bradykinesia, and a wide-based, shuffling gait. Laboratory testing was unremarkable. The extent of calcification and clinical correlates excluded physiological calcifications.3 The patient's presentation and computed tomography of head were consistent with PFBC (image).1,2 

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