OMT Minute  |   February 2020
Osteopathic Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment of Dysfunction at the Thoracolumbar Junction
Author Notes
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Drew D. Lewis, DO, Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine, 3200 Grand Ave, Des Moines, IA 50312-4104. Email address: drew.d.lewis@dmu.edu
     
Article Information
Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders
OMT Minute   |   February 2020
Osteopathic Approach to Diagnosis and Treatment of Dysfunction at the Thoracolumbar Junction
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2020, Vol. 120, e3-e4. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.023
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2020, Vol. 120, e3-e4. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2020.023
Gordon Zink, DO, presented an efficient and effective means of approaching a patient from the respiratory circulatory model with a goal of maximizing venous, lymphatic, and arterial flow to improve health.1 Some of the key somatic dysfunctions in his treatment approach were found at the transition zones of the body, which are not only areas of increased stress, but are also closely associated with transverse diaphragms.1 
At the thoracolumbar junction (T12-L1), the kyphotic curve of the thoracic spine is transitioning to the lordotic curve of the lumbar spine. This transition zone is therefore a crossover or inflection point of the spine and is subject to increased stresses, injury, and somatic dysfunctions. The horizontal diaphragm associated with the thoracolumbar region of the spine is the thoracoabdominal diaphragm. 

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