Brief Report  |   December 2019
Amniotic Umbilical Cord Particulate for Discogenic Pain
Author Notes
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported.  
  • Support: None reported.  
  •  *Address correspondence to Derek Buck, MD, DC, Sideline Orthopedics and Sports Medicine 250 S Main St, Ste 224 A, Blacksburg, VA 24060-4726. Email: spineprecision@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Obstetrics and Gynecology / Pain Management/Palliative Care
Brief Report   |   December 2019
Amniotic Umbilical Cord Particulate for Discogenic Pain
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, December 2019, Vol. 119, 814-819. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2019.138
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, December 2019, Vol. 119, 814-819. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2019.138
Abstract

Context: Discogenic low back pain is the most common type of low back pain and is a major cause of morbidity worldwide. Current nonoperative treatment options are limited in efficacy and lack evidence of long-term pain relief; thus, there is an unmet clinical need for an effective treatment for patients with discogenic pain. Amniotic membrane and umbilical cord (AMUC) particulate may be useful in relieving pain and inhibiting the degenerative cascade in patients with discogenic pain by reducing inflammation.

Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of AMUC particulate for discogenic pain.

Methods: Six months of conservative therapy failed in patients who had discogenic pain confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging and provocative discography. They subsequently received intradiskal injection of 50 to 100 mg of AMUC particulate for cervical, lumbar, and lumbosacral disks.

Results: A total of 11 patients with 20 disks were included. Before treatment, all patients reported severe pain, and 10 patients took opioids daily. After treatment, the median reported pain relief was 40%, 50%, and 75% at 1-month (n=6), 3 months (n=8), and 6 months (n=5), respectively. Complete pain relief was noted in 1 patient; however, 2 patients (18%) reported no pain relief at 1 and 3 months. No adverse events, repeated procedures, or complications occurred.

Conclusion: This preliminary evidence suggests that a single intradiskal injection of AMUC particulate is safe and may provide symptomatic pain relief in some patients with discogenic pain.

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