JAOA/AACOM Medical Education  |   August 2019
Novel Approach to Introducing an Ultrasonography Curriculum With Limited Instructor Resources
Author Notes
  • From Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Parker, Colorado (Drs Evans and Thiessen); the Department of Emergency Medicine at Denver Health Medical Center in Colorado (Dr Thiessen); and the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora (Dr Thiessen). 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Danika K. Evans, DO, Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine, 8401 S Chambers Rd, Parker, Colorado 80134-9498. Email: nikakevans@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Imaging / Medical Education / Curriculum
JAOA/AACOM Medical Education   |   August 2019
Novel Approach to Introducing an Ultrasonography Curriculum With Limited Instructor Resources
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2019, Vol. 119, 533-540. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2019.095
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2019, Vol. 119, 533-540. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2019.095
Abstract

Context: Ultrasonography is becoming more prevalent in clinical practice, but medical schools looking to implement preclinical training are limited by financial and faculty resources.

Objective: To design a single-instructor model to save faculty resources and to determine whether this model is effective at teaching ultrasonography to preclinical medical students.

Methods: This single-instructor model included 3 components: (1) flipped classroom, where students watched an online lecture covering examination techniques; (2) in-person scanning sessions, where students scanned each other after the instructor went through lecture content and pathologic images, a video camera to show probe placement and examination technique, and a live feed from an ultrasonography demonstration; and (3) feedback on written examination questions and course evaluations.

Results: When compared with a traditional ultrasonography curriculum, which requires approximately 600 instruction hours annually, this program required 96 hours. Students reported appreciation of exposure to ultrasonography but expressed desire for smaller group sizes and greater individual instruction. Students performed well on written test questions, with the first-year class answering 88% correctly and the second-year class answering 90.6% correctly.

Conclusions: Although this educational format was used successfully to teach introductory ultrasonography to preclinical students, feedback suggested that students would prefer more individual instruction. The authors look toward implementing a peer-instructor format, forming smaller laboratory groups, and improving skill assessment.

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