SURF  |   July 2019
OMT for the Prevention and Management of Chronic Constipation and Distal Intestinal Obstructive Syndrome in Cystic Fibrosis: A Pilot Study
Author Notes
  • From Maine-Dartmouth Family Medicine Residency in Augusta (Dr Modlin); Dignity Health Methodist Hospital of Sacramento in California (Dr Borofka); the Department of Pediatrics at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater (Dr Franzini); Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine in East Lansing and Metropolitan Health Hospital in Grand Rapids, Michigan (Dr Klene-Bowns); and the Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine-California in Vallejo (Dr Nuño). Drs Modlin and Borofka are residents. 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Sara E. Modlin, DO, 15 E Chestnut St, Augusta, ME 04330-5736. Email: sara.modlin@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Gastroenterology / Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment / Preventive Medicine / Pulmonary Disorders
SURF   |   July 2019
OMT for the Prevention and Management of Chronic Constipation and Distal Intestinal Obstructive Syndrome in Cystic Fibrosis: A Pilot Study
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 2019, Vol. 119, e31-e35. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.084
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 2019, Vol. 119, e31-e35. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.084
Abstract

Context: Cystic fibrosis (CF) is an autosomal recessive genetic disorder primarily affecting the lungs and digestive system. Patients with CF often have multiorgan dysfunction, including chronic lung infections, pancreatic insufficiency, chronic constipation, and distal intestinal obstructive syndrome (DIOS).

Objective: To understand the impact of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) on the prevention and management of gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with CF.

Methods: This study used OMT for physical manipulation of the viscera, spine, and other somatic components to improve bowel symptoms and prevent DIOS. These effects were achieved by releasing myofascial restrictions found in the abdomen and somatic structures with the intent to optimize the autonomic and lymphatic systems and improve range of motion.

Results: Four of 5 participants had a decrease in pain, and 3 participants had a reduced need for laxatives during treatment. Four participants had an overall increase in satisfaction with their bowel movements while being treated with OMT.

Conclusion: These findings support the use of OMT as a method for the management of chronic constipation and DIOS in the CF population. However, because of the small population size, more research with larger populations is needed.

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