JAOA/AACOM Medical Education  |   April 2019
Improving Medical Education by Coupling Basic Science Lectures With ICD-10 Codes
Author Notes
  • From the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg, Virginia (VCOM; Student Doctor Stanco and Dr Prater); the VCOM Center for Bioinformatics and Genetics and the Primary Care Research Network (Mr Wubah, Mr Sumpter, and Dr Garner); the VCOM Simulation and Technology Center (Dr Rawlins); and the Gibbs Cancer Center and Research Institute in Spartanburg, South Carolina (Dr Garner). 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: This project was supported by the Bradley Foundation and internal funding by VCOM. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Harold R. Garner, PhD, Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine–Carolinas Campus, 101 E Wood St, Spartanburg, SC 29303-3515. Email: skipgarner@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Medical Education / Curriculum
JAOA/AACOM Medical Education   |   April 2019
Improving Medical Education by Coupling Basic Science Lectures With ICD-10 Codes
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 2019, Vol. 119, 251-256. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.042
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 2019, Vol. 119, 251-256. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.042
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1
Abstract

At the Edward Via College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM), students are taught through a systems-based block education process organized according to separate organ systems. The block education lectures provide instruction on these various organ systems and their associated diseases and potential for diagnosis and treatment. A curricular initiative implemented at VCOM incorporates International Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision (ICD-10) codes into the preclinical curriculum to enhance student learning and recall of basic science information and to prepare them for patient encounters during clinical rotations. In constructing this curricular initiative, diseases and procedures mentioned in all lectures during the first 2 years were evaluated and matched with their corresponding ICD-10 diagnostic and procedural codes to illustrate to students how this information would be used in a clinical setting. Of 994 lectures with 36,105 slides, 4331 opportunities to associate ICD-10 codes were identified. Information was given to instructors to update their future lectures. This initiative aims to enhance the preclinical educational experience and prepare preclinical students for documenting patient care. After students have been fully exposed to this new learning component, a study is planned to analyze the effects of the curriculum.

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