Brief Report  |   March 2019
Prior Knowledge of the Mediterranean Diet Is Associated With Dietary Adherence in Cardiac Patients
Author Notes
  • From the Centers for Health Sciences (Student Doctor Greiner and Dr Croff) and Rural Health (Dr Wheeler) at Oklahoma State University in Tulsa and the College of Health Education at Oklahoma State University in Stillwater (Dr Miller). 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Benjamin Greiner, OMS III, Center for Health Sciences, Oklahoma State University, 429 Willard Hall, Stillwater, OK 74078-1001. Email: ben.greiner@okstate.edu
     
Article Information
Cardiovascular Disorders
Brief Report   |   March 2019
Prior Knowledge of the Mediterranean Diet Is Associated With Dietary Adherence in Cardiac Patients
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2019, Vol. 119, 183-188. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.029
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2019, Vol. 119, 183-188. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.029
Abstract

Context: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in the United States, and cardiovascular events have been shown to be reduced and prevented when patients follow the Mediterranean diet.

Objective: To understand how familiarity with the Mediterranean diet affects dietary habits in cardiology patients by using social cognitive theory.

Method: This cross-sectional study included patients at a metropolitan outpatient cardiology clinic in Oklahoma. A survey was used to analyze patient knowledge of the Mediterranean diet. Patients were separated into low–, medium–, and high–diet adherence groups based on their daily consumption of fruits, vegetables, fish, whole grains, and nuts. Multinomial logistic regression was used to analyze patients’ knowledge of Mediterranean diet principles with dietary adherence.

Results: A total of 337 patients were included in the study. Patients with a college education, patients reporting familiarity with the diet, and women were 6.7, 4.0, and 3.2 times as likely, respectively, to have strong adherence to the Mediterranean diet.

Conclusion: The finding that familiarity with the Mediterranean diet was closely associated with adherence to its principles indicates that patient education on heart-healthy diets may improve the eating habits of patients, especially patients at risk for cardiac events.

Subscribe to view more

For full access to this article, log in to an existing user account, purchase an annual subscription, or purchase a short-term subscription.

Order a subscription

Subscribe

Pay Per View

Entire Journal
30-Day Access

$50.00

Buy Now

This Issue
7-Day Access

$25.00

Buy Now

This article
24-Hour Access

$10.00

Buy Now

Sign In Or Create an account

Please sign in using your Osteopathic.org login.
If you do not have an AOA login, you may create a new account.

Or Subscribe