Original Contribution  |   February 2019
Assessing Competency in Family Medicine Residents Using the Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise
Author Notes
  • From the A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Mesa, Arizona (Drs LeBeau, Morgan, and Heath); the Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education National Family Medicine Residency program in Scranton, Pennsylvania (Dr LeBeau); and Research Support at A.T. Still University in Kirksville, Missouri (Ms Pazdernik).  
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported.  
  • Support: This study was supported by a grant from the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine and the Osteopathic Heritage Foundation.  
  •  *Address correspondence to Lawrence LeBeau, DO, A.T. Still University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Arizona, 5850 E Still Circle, Mesa, AZ 85206-3618. Email: llebeau@atsu.edu
     
Article Information
Original Contribution   |   February 2019
Assessing Competency in Family Medicine Residents Using the Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2019, Vol. 119, 81-88. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.013
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2019, Vol. 119, 81-88. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2019.013
Abstract

Context: The Mini-Clinical Evaluation Exercise (Mini-CEX) is one example of a direct observation tool used for workplace-based skills assessment. The Mini-CEX has been validated as a useful formative evaluation tool in graduate medical education. However, no Mini-CEX has been reported in the literature that specifically assesses the osteopathic manipulative medicine (OMM) skills of family medicine residents. Therefore, the authors created and studied an OMM Mini-CEX to fill this skills assessment gap.

Objective: To determine whether the OMM Mini-CEX is perceived as an effective evaluation tool for assessing the OMM core competencies of family medicine residents.

Methods: Faculty and residents of The Wright Center for Graduate Medical Education National Family Medicine Residency program participated in the study. Each resident was evaluated at least once using the OMM Mini-CEX. Surveys were used to assess faculty and resident perceptions of the usefulness and effectiveness of the OMM Mini-CEX for assessing OMM competencies.

Results: Eighty-one responses were received during 2 survey cycles within a 7-month period. The internal consistency of the survey responses had a high reliability (Cronbach α=0.93). Considering respondents who agreed that they had a clear understanding of the general purpose of a Mini-CEX, the perceived effectiveness score for the OMM Mini-CEX was higher among those who agreed that a Mini-CEX was a useful part of training than among those who disagreed or were unsure of its usefulness (median score, 4.0 vs 3.4, respectively; P=.047).

Conclusions: The results suggest the OMM Mini-CEX can be a useful direct observation evaluation tool to assess OMM core competencies in family medicine residents. Additional research is needed to determine its perceived effectiveness in other clinical specialties and in undergraduate medical education.

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