STILL RELEVANT?  |   January 2019
Jeanette “Nettie” Bolles: The First Female DO
Author Notes
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Thomas A. Quinn, DO, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Family and Occupational Medicine, 5000 Lakewood Ranch Blvd, Bradenton, FL 34211. Email: tquinn@lecom.edu
     
Article Information
Medical Education / Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Pediatrics / Being a DO
STILL RELEVANT?   |   January 2019
Jeanette “Nettie” Bolles: The First Female DO
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2019, Vol. 119, 6. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2019.002
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2019, Vol. 119, 6. doi:https://doi.org/10.7556/jaoa.2019.002
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1
Jeanette “Nettie” Bolles (née Hubbard) was only a child when her father was shot and left for dead during the border wars between Kansas and Missouri. Andrew Taylor Still, MD, who had not yet founded osteopathy, removed the bullet and doctored him back to health. Years later, her mother became paralyzed after a fall. Bolles brought her mother to Kirksville to be treated by Still. She watched her mother improve with daily osteopathic manipulative treatments administered by Still. Bolles was already a graduate of the University of Kansas, but she was inspired by his new method of treatment and inquired about attending the school he was preparing to open.1 Still assured her that she could learn osteopathy, the same as any man, and welcomed her into the first class of the American School of Osteopathy (ASO).2 

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