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Supplement Article  |   September 1999
Alzheimer's disease diagnosis
Article Information
Supplement Article   |   September 1999
Alzheimer's disease diagnosis
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 1999, Vol. 99, S1-S6. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1999.99.9.S1
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 1999, Vol. 99, S1-S6. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1999.99.9.S1
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Abstract

This section reviews some of the more prominent alternate causes of dementia that need to be excluded when pursuing a diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. In practice, this exclusion cannot be done with 100% precision. Consequently, the accuracy of the clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease is approximately 85%. Brain biopsy, which is seldom performed in practice, is the only method of moving diagnostic accuracy to near 100%. There is yet no intervention that halts or reverses the underlying pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, so the invasive brain biopsy is rarely justified to confirm a diagnosis.