Online First
Case Report  |   October 2018
Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment as a Novel Way to Manage Postvasectomy Pain Syndrome
Author Notes
  • From the Family Health Clinic at the Yokota Air Base in Japan and the Ehrling Bergquist Family Medicine Residency at Offutt Air Force Base in Nebraska. 
  • Disclaimer: The views expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the Department of the United States Air Force, the Department of Defense, or the US Government. 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Richard E. Gray, DO, PSC, 78 Box 1404 APO, AP 96326. Email: nomadicgray@yahoo.com
     
Article Information
Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment / Pain Management/Palliative Care / Psychiatry / Urological Disorders
Case Report   |   October 2018
Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment as a Novel Way to Manage Postvasectomy Pain Syndrome
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Published Online First on October 29, 2018. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.162
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Published Online First on October 29, 2018. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.162
Abstract

Postvasectomy pain syndrome (PVPS) can be debilitating and is notoriously difficult to treat, often requiring a multidisciplinary approach. In this case report, osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) was used to treat a patient with PVPS. After vasectomy, an otherwise-healthy man experienced chronic right testicular pain, aggravated by exercise, touch, and sexual intercourse, resulting in marital strain and an inability to perform routine fitness activities. Symptoms persisted for 8 years, despite lifestyle modifications, orally administered pain regimens, pelvic floor physical therapy, nerve blocks, steroid injections, epididymectomy, spermatic cord denervation, and counseling. After the patient's urologist suggested orchiectomy, his family medicine physician referred him for OMT. The OMT interventions, applied over a 4-month period, were directed at the lumbar spine, pelvis, pelvic floor, and lower abdomen. After treatment, the patient reported absence of testicular pain most of the time and described his quality of life as “10 times better.” Literature review revealed no reports of OMT used to manage PVPS.

Subscribe to view more

For full access to this article, log in to an existing user account, purchase an annual subscription, or purchase a short-term subscription.

Order a subscription

Subscribe

Pay Per View

Entire Journal
30-Day Access

$30.00

Buy Now

This Issue
7-Day Access

$15.00

Buy Now

This article
24-Hour Access

$5.00

Buy Now

Sign In Or Create an account

Please sign in using your Osteopathic.org login.
If you do not have an AOA login, you may create a new account.

Or Subscribe