SURF  |   August 2018
Sleep and Lifestyle Habits of Osteopathic Emergency Medicine Residents During Training
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Emergency Medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson (Dr K.E. Hughes); the Sparrow Health System/Michigan State University (MSU) Emergency Medicine Residency in Lansing (Dr M.J. Hughes); the MSU College of Osteopathic Medicine in Lansing (Drs K.E. Hughes, P.G. Hughes, and M.J. Hughes); and the Florida Atlantic University Charles E. Schmidt College of Medicine in Boca Raton, Florida (Dr P.G. Hughes). Dr K.E. Hughes was chief resident at MSU Emergency Medicine Residency at the time of manuscript submission. 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Kate E. Hughes, DO, Chief Resident, Michigan State University Emergency Medicine Residency, Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine, Department of Osteopathic Medical Specialties, 909 Fee Rd, East Lansing, MI 48824-6410. Email: hughesk18@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Emergency Medicine / Medical Education / Graduate Medical Education
SURF   |   August 2018
Sleep and Lifestyle Habits of Osteopathic Emergency Medicine Residents During Training
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2018, Vol. 118, e45-e50. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.113
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2018, Vol. 118, e45-e50. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.113
Abstract

Context: Duty hours were enacted in 2003 with the intent to improve patient safety and resident well-being. However, limited data exist regarding improvements in residents’ well-being since the implementation of these restrictions.

Objective: To examine osteopathic emergency medicine (EM) resident characteristics regarding sleep and lifestyle habits and duty hour reporting.

Method: A convenience sample of osteopathic EM residents was surveyed at a statewide conference in May 2014. The conference included 177 residents from 15 osteopathic EM residencies. Data regarding demographics, sleep and lifestyle habits (including work-related motor vehicle incidents [MVIs] and chemical aid use for sleep/wakefulness), and duty hour reporting were collected. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was calculated, with a score greater than 10 indicating sleep disturbance.

Results: Of the 128 residents (72%) who returned the survey, approximately two-thirds were female, were currently on an EM rotation, and were training in suburban emergency departments with more than 60,000 annual visits. Only 35% of respondents slept 8 or more hours per night during an EM rotation, and 63% admitted to weight change during residency. Forty-two percent of respondents had a work-related MVI, which was more likely to occur if their ESS score was greater than 11 (P<.03). Mean (SD) ESS score was 9.9 (4.8; range, 0-24). Respondents reported using chemical aids for staying awake or going to sleep on a mean (SD) of 6.9 (9.3) days per month (range, 0-30). The majority of respondents (84%) reported strict duty hour enforcement policies, few (17%) had ever been asked to falsify reports, and more than half (56%) had ever voluntarily reported false hours.

Conclusion: Most residents surveyed slept fewer than 8 hours per night and had a weight change during EM residency training. The majority of residents used a chemical aid for sleep or wakefulness. Nearly half of residents surveyed met criteria for disordered sleep, which was associated with a higher occurrence of MVIs.

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