Clinical Images  |   August 2018
Orbital Fat Prolapse
Author Notes
  • From the Mayo Clinic Health System in Albert Lea, Minnesota (Dr Skorin), and the Minneapolis VA Health System in Minnesota (Dr Norberg). 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Leonid Skorin Jr, DO, OD, MS, Mayo Clinic Health System in Albert Lea, 404 W Fountain St, Albert Lea, MN 56007-2437. Email: skorin.leonid@mayo.edu
     
Article Information
Emergency Medicine / Endocrinology / Imaging / Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology / Clinical Images
Clinical Images   |   August 2018
Orbital Fat Prolapse
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2018, Vol. 118, 560. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.127
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2018, Vol. 118, 560. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.127
A 79-year-old man presented with an asymptomatic yellowish mass on his temporal bulbar conjunctiva of the left eye. The patient's visual acuity was unaffected, and he had no history of ocular trauma, surgery, or thyroid dysfunction. Ocular examination revealed a soft, yellow, nontender mobile mass. Subconjunctival herniated orbital fat (HOF), also known as intraconal fat prolapse (image A, arrow), was diagnosed. The patient also had bilateral inferior and superior medial eyelid festoons, also known as extraconal fat prolapse (image B, arrows). The subconjunctival HOF was surgically removed. The patient declined blepharoplasty to remove the extraconal fat protrusion. 

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