The Somatic Connection  |   May 2018
Cervical HVLA Used as Single Intervention Improves Motion and Strength
Author Notes
  • Western University of Health Sciences-College of Osteopathic Medicine, Pomona, California 
Article Information
The Somatic Connection   |   May 2018
Cervical HVLA Used as Single Intervention Improves Motion and Strength
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2018, Vol. 118, 346-348. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.068
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2018, Vol. 118, 346-348. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.068
Galindez-Ibarbengoetxea X, Setuain I, Andersen LL, et al. Effects of cervical high-velocity low-amplitude techniques on range of motion, strength performance, and cardiovascular outcomes: a review. J Altern Complement Med. 2017;23(9):667-675. 
Osteopathic physicians have the ability to provide an individualized and unique approach to patients with a variety of chief complaints.1 Despite the efficacy of this approach recorded in the osteopathic literature, meta-analyses and systematic reviews continue to exclude osteopathic research based solely on the study design. The profession needs to be cognizant of this ongoing issue, which diminishes the impact of osteopathic manipulative medicine. 
Cervical high-velocity, low-amplitude (HVLA) is one of the most common techniques used by foreign-trained osteopaths, osteopathic physicians, physiotherapists, and chiropractors. Most research related to HVLA has been in relationship to neck pain or adverse effects after cervical HVLA. This gap in the literature led an international group of researchers to perform a systematic review of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) looking at the isolated effect of cervical HVLA on various conditions, including strength, spine and temporomandibular joint mobility, and the cardiovascular system, with no restriction on the outcomes measured. The researchers excluded studies that used a multimodal approach because, they argued, these studies lacked specificity in the effect size outcomes. Yet, they did not evaluate the effect size of all the included studies for specific outcomes. 

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