Online First
Brief Report  |   April 2018
Safety of Osteopathic Cranial Manipulative Medicine as an Adjunct to Conventional Postconcussion Symptom Management: A Pilot Study
Author Notes
  • From the Donald and Barbara Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell in Hempstead, New York (Drs Patel and Sabini) and Southside Hospital in Bay Shore, New York (Dr Sabini). Dr Patel is a fourth-year resident. 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Komal G. Patel, DO, 1554 Northern Blvd, Manhasset, NY 11030-3006. Email: kpatel21@northwell.edu
     
Article Information
Emergency Medicine / Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Pain Management/Palliative Care / Palliative Care
Brief Report   |   April 2018
Safety of Osteopathic Cranial Manipulative Medicine as an Adjunct to Conventional Postconcussion Symptom Management: A Pilot Study
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Published Online First on April 16, 2018. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.061
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association Published Online First on April 16, 2018. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.061
Abstract

Context: Osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine is not a well-established adjunct to conventional treatment for patients with postconcussion symptoms.

Objective: To determine whether adjunctive osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine is safe for patients with concussion when accompanied by conventional treatments.

Design: Prospective observational pilot study.

Setting: Outpatient concussion clinic.

Participants: Patients who sustained a concussion were prospectively recruited from an outpatient concussion clinic by a neuropsychologist specialized in concussion. All participants were identified to have a cranial dysfunction.

Intervention: Each eligible participant received 1 session of the osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine vault hold technique.

Main Outcome Measures: Self-reported adverse events during or after 1 session of the osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine procedure and improvement in concussion symptoms at return to follow-up.

Results: None of the 9 participants reported adverse events during or immediately after receiving osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine. Five of the 7 participants who returned for follow-up demonstrated improvement in their overall concussion symptoms based on the Post-Concussion Symptom Scale scores.

Conclusions: Osteopathic cranial manipulative medicine was considered a safe adjunctive treatment option to improve concussion-related symptoms and recovery.

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