Case Report  |   May 2018
Restoration of Full Shoulder Range of Motion After Application of the Fascial Distortion Model
Author Notes
  • From the Des Moines University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Iowa. 
  • Financial Disclosures: Dr Figueroa is a member of the Board of the American Fascial Distortion Model Association. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Joshua D. Boucher, DO, 756 Herrington Dr, Grovetown, GA 30813-4239. Email: joshua.d.boucher@dmu.edu
     
Article Information
Emergency Medicine / Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Pain Management/Palliative Care
Case Report   |   May 2018
Restoration of Full Shoulder Range of Motion After Application of the Fascial Distortion Model
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2018, Vol. 118, 341-344. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.044
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2018, Vol. 118, 341-344. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2018.044
Abstract

Decreased active and passive range of motion (ROM) accompanied by pain in the shoulder is a common presentation for patients with frozen shoulder, and it can be difficult to restore normal function. Through the fascial distortion model, physicians can apply a manual technique to rapidly and effectively increase ROM and decrease pain. A 28-year-old man presented 18 months after sustaining a shoulder hyperextension injury. On active and passive ROM examination, he had approximately 90° of shoulder abduction and moderately reduced internal rotation associated with 8/10 pain. After 2 applications of the fascial distortion model, his shoulder restored to full abduction and internal rotation with no pain.

Subscribe to view more

For full access to this article, log in to an existing user account, purchase an annual subscription, or purchase a short-term subscription.

Order a subscription

Subscribe

Pay Per View

Entire Journal
30-Day Access

$30.00

Buy Now

This Issue
7-Day Access

$15.00

Buy Now

This article
24-Hour Access

$5.00

Buy Now

Sign In Or Create an account

Please sign in using your Osteopathic.org login.
If you do not have an AOA login, you may create a new account.

Or Subscribe