Case Report  |   June 2017
Use of the Fascial Distortion Model to Evaluate a Limp in a Child
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Family Medicine and Community Health at the University of Wisconsin in Madison. 
  • Financial Disclosures: None reported. 
  • Support: None reported. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Sarah J. James, DO, 1100 Delaplaine Ct, Madison, WI 53715-1896. E-mail: sarah.james@fammed.wisc.edu
     
Article Information
Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Pediatrics
Case Report   |   June 2017
Use of the Fascial Distortion Model to Evaluate a Limp in a Child
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, June 2017, Vol. 117, 399-402. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2017.079
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, June 2017, Vol. 117, 399-402. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2017.079
Abstract

Pediatric limp is a relatively common condition in primary care and can be challenging to diagnose and manage. Common causes of painful pediatric limp include transient synovitis, septic arthritis, osteomyelitis, and trauma. The authors present the case of an 11-year-old girl with a painful limp and anterior ankle pain of unclear origin. Osteopathic structural examination revealed a somatic dysfunction known as continuum distortion, 1 of 6 fascial alterations identified in the fascial distortion model. Myofascial release was applied, providing rapid, complete resolution of symptoms. This case demonstrates that osteopathic physicians may consider the fascial distortion model framework when identifying causes of pain in patients.

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