STILL RELEVANT?  |   March 2017
Opening the Doors of Medicine to Women
Author Notes
  •  *Address correspondence to Thomas A. Quinn, DO, Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine at Bradenton, 5000 Lakewood Ranch Blvd, Bradenton, FL 34211-4909. E-mail: tquinn@lecom.edu
     
Article Information
Emergency Medicine / Medical Education / Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Being a DO
STILL RELEVANT?   |   March 2017
Opening the Doors of Medicine to Women
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2017, Vol. 117, 149. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2017.028
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2017, Vol. 117, 149. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2017.028
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1
At the time of the inception of osteopathy in the late 19th century, the practice of medicine was dominated by men. In 1892, Andrew Taylor Still, MD, DO, opened the American School of Osteopathy (ASO) in Kirksville, Missouri. Still stated: “I opened wide the doors of my first school for ladies.”1(p413) The ASO not only was the first college of osteopathic medicine, an entirely new and innovative medical reformation, but also accepted female students on an equal basis as male students. The first catalog of the ASO stated: 
When Still established the ASO, most medical schools were open to men only.3 A smaller number of medical schools, mostly homeopathic and eclectic, accepted few women into their classes,4 and a handful of all-female medical schools existed.5 
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