Special Communication  |   February 2017
Buerger Test for Erythromelalgia Revisited
Author Notes
  • From the Division of Infectious Diseases (Dr Wright) and the Division of Cardiology (Dr Rajachandran) in the Department of Medicine at Memorial Medical Center in York, Pennyslvania. 
  •  *Address correspondence to William F. Wright, DO, MPH, Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, Memorial Medical Center, 1600 6th Ave, Ste 114, York, PA 17403-2643. E-mail: william.wright.f@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Cardiovascular Disorders
Special Communication   |   February 2017
Buerger Test for Erythromelalgia Revisited
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2017, Vol. 117, 124-126. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2017.023
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2017, Vol. 117, 124-126. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2017.023
Abstract

Leo Buerger, MD, was the first to describe dependent rubor associated with marked atherosclerosis. Historically, dependent rubor has been described as erythromelalgia (or erythromelia), and terms such as chronic rubor, reactionary rubor, induced rubor, and hyperemic response have also been used to describe this sign associated with peripheral vascular disease. This brief review will reacquaint physicians with the Buerger test, which is used to assess arterial sufficiency, as well as erythromelalgia, and the proposed mechanisms responsible for erythromelalgia. The Buerger test is an important consideration when examining patients for erythromelalgia, which remains distinct from erythema associated with skin and soft-tissue infections.

Subscribe to view more

For full access to this article, log in to an existing user account, purchase an annual subscription, or purchase a short-term subscription.

Order a subscription

Subscribe

Pay Per View

Entire Journal
30-Day Access

$30.00

Buy Now

This Issue
7-Day Access

$15.00

Buy Now

This article
24-Hour Access

$5.00

Buy Now

Sign In Or Create an account

Please sign in using your Osteopathic.org login.
If you do not have an AOA login, you may create a new account.

Or Subscribe