Clinical Images  |   January 2017
Blue Sclera and Tendon Rupture
Author Notes
  • From the William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Hattiesburg, Mississippi (Student Doctor Gavini); the Pacific University College of Optometry in Forest Grove, Oregon (Mr Turpin); and the Mayo Clinic Health System in Albert Lea, Minnesota (Dr Skorin). 
  •  *Address correspondence to Leonid Skorin Jr, DO, OD, MS, Mayo Clinic Health System, 404 W Fountain St, Albert Lea, MN 56007-2437. E-mail: skorin.leonid@mayo.edu
     
Article Information
Emergency Medicine / Imaging / Ophthalmology and Otolaryngology / Clinical Images
Clinical Images   |   January 2017
Blue Sclera and Tendon Rupture
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2017, Vol. 117, 64. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2017.015
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2017, Vol. 117, 64. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2017.015
A 53-year-old man presented for an ocular health evaluation. Early in his childhood, the patient received a diagnosis of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) type I. His medical history included 27 bone fractures before age 12 years, multiple tendon ruptures, osteoporosis, a mechanical aortic valve replacement, and recurrent corneal erosions. The examination revealed a blue-gray appearance of the sclera in both eyes (image A). Results of a corneal pachymetry measurement revealed decreased corneal thickness. A recent magnetic resonance image revealed a complete rupture of his quadriceps tendon distally (image B, arrow). The diagnosis was corneal thinning secondary to OI type I. 
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