Brief Report  |   November 2016
Pregnancy Research on Osteopathic Manipulation Optimizing Treatment Effects: The PROMOTE Study Protocol
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Osteopathic Manipulative Medicine at the University of North Texas Health Science Center Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Worth (Dr Hensel), the University of Pikeville Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine (Dr Carnes), and Stoll Neurodiagnostics in Fort Worth, Texas (Dr Stoll). 
  • Support: Supported by grants number K23AT003304 and K23AT3304-4S1 from the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine at the National Institutes of Health and grant number 06-11-549 from the American Osteopathic Association. Additional financial support was provided by the Medical Education Foundation of the American College of Osteopathic Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Osteopathy, the Osteopathic Heritage Foundations, and The Osteopathic Research Center at the University of North Texas Health Science Center. 
  • Disclaimer: Dr Hensel, a JAOA associate editor, was not involved in the editorial review or decision to publish this article. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Kendi L. Hensel, DO, PhD, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107-2644. E-mail: kendi.hensel@unthsc.edu
     
Article Information
Obstetrics and Gynecology / Osteopathic Manipulative Treatment
Brief Report   |   November 2016
Pregnancy Research on Osteopathic Manipulation Optimizing Treatment Effects: The PROMOTE Study Protocol
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, November 2016, Vol. 116, 716-724. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.142
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, November 2016, Vol. 116, 716-724. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.142
Abstract

The structural and physiologic changes in a woman’s body during pregnancy can predispose pregnant women to low back pain and its associated disability, as well as to complications of pregnancy, labor, and delivery. Anecdotal and empirical evidence has indicated that osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) may be efficacious in improving pain and functionality in women who are pregnant. Based on that premise, the Pregnancy Research on Osteopathic Manipulation Optimizing Treatment Effects (PROMOTE) study was designed as a prospective, randomized, placebo-controlled, and blinded clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of an OMT protocol for pain during third-trimester pregnancy. The OMT protocol developed for the PROMOTE study was based on physiologic theory and the concept of the interrelationship of structure and function. The 12 well-defined, standardized OMT techniques used in the protocol are commonly taught at osteopathic medical schools in the United States. These techniques can be easily replicated as a 20-minute protocol applied in conjunction with usual prenatal care, thus making it feasible to implement into clinical practice. This article presents an overview of the study design and treatment protocols used in the PROMOTE study.

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