Brief Report  |   September 2016
Retropubic Dilation With a Foley Catheter Balloon: A Novel Technique for Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Placement
Author Notes
  • From the Departments of Urological Surgery (Drs Szell, McIntosh, DiMatteo, and Campbell) and Medical Education and Research (Dr Shaw) at St John Providence Health System in Warren, Michigan. 
  •  * Address correspondence to Nicole M. Szell, DO, Department of Urological Surgery, St John Providence Health System, 11800 E 12 Mile Rd, Warren, MI 48093-3472. E-mail: szellnic@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Brief Report   |   September 2016
Retropubic Dilation With a Foley Catheter Balloon: A Novel Technique for Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Placement
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 2016, Vol. 116, 594-598. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.118
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 2016, Vol. 116, 594-598. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.118
Abstract

Background: The 3-piece inflatable penile prosthesis was introduced in 1973 as a treatment for men with erectile dysfunction. Consisting of 2 corporal cylinders, 1 pump, and a fluid-filled reservoir, the prosthesis is placed by blunt dissection into the retropubic space. The dissection for the reservoir is performed blindly into a space juxtaposed with nerves, vessels, and the bladder.

Objective: To propose a novel approach for inflatable penile prosthesis reservoir placement involving gentle dilation of the retropubic space using a Foley catheter balloon.

Methods: Patient medical records from 1 surgeon were reviewed. Patients did not have a history of pelvic surgery or prostatectomy. Each implant was approached using a penoscrotal incision, and the retropubic space was dilated with a 30-mL Foley catheter balloon filled to 100-mL capacity before reservoir placement. The postoperative visits were examined for complications, including reservoir infection and herniation. A literature search of penile prosthesis reservoir placement technique and complications (eg, herniation, infection) of reservoir placement was also performed.

Results: Fifteen patient records were examined. The reservoir herniation rate was 0% and the infection rate was 7%. The average reservoir herniation rate is reported to be 1% to 3%, and the average infection rate is reported to be 1% to 5%.

Conclusion: The use of a Foley catheter balloon is a safe, atraumatic, cost-effective, and easily performed method of dilating the retropubic space for subsequent inflatable penile prosthesis reservoir placement.

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