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Clinical Images  |   July 2016
Nodular Torus Palatinus
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at the Tri-Service General Hospital in the National Defense Medical Center in Taipei, Taiwan (Drs Lai and Wang); the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery in the Taichung Armed Forces General Hospital in Taichung, Taiwan (Dr Lai); and the Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine and Department of Otolaryngology in the College of Medicine in Taipei Medical University and Shuang-Ho Hospital in New Taipei City, Taiwan (Dr Wang). 
  •  *Address correspondence to Hsing-Won Wang, MD, PhD, Graduate Institute of Clinical Medicine and Department of Otolaryngology, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Shuang Ho Hospital, No. 291 Jhong-Jheng Rd, Jhonghe, New Taipei City, Taiwan. E-mail: w0512n@ms15.hinet.net
     
Article Information
Imaging / Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Clinical Images
Clinical Images   |   July 2016
Nodular Torus Palatinus
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 2016, Vol. 116, 491. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.100
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 2016, Vol. 116, 491. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.100
A 66-year-old asymptomatic woman with a history of masses on the roof of her mouth since adolescence was referred for an evaluation of the intraoral masses. Her medical history was otherwise unremarkable. The intraoral masses had not increased in size, nor had there been any bleeding. A clinical examination revealed 4 hard nodules with normal overlying mucosa on the hard palate (panel A, arrows). A computed tomographic image showed a 3.1-cm highly calcified lobulated mass growing from the palatal bone from a transverse view (panel B, asterisk) and a coronal view (panel C, asterisk). Because the lesion was asymptomatic, no intervention was pursued. Size and appearance were unchanged 18-months later. 
Torus palatinus, the most common intraoral exostosis among postmenopausal women, is a localized outgrowth of bone on the surface of the maxilla. The growth of torus palatinus is gradual, increasing during the second and third decades of life. Torus palatinus can be unilobular or polylobular and can be flat, nodular, or spindle-shaped.1 Removal of the nodules is rarely necessary. 
Reference
Reference
Loukas M, Hulsberg P, Tubbs RS, et al.  . The tori of the mouth and ear: a review. Clin Anat. 2013;26(8):953-960. doi:10.100/ca.22264. [CrossRef] [PubMed]