The Somatic Connection  |   May 2016
Spinal Mobilization Has Peripheral Vasodilation Effects
Author Notes
  • Western University of Health Sciences College of Osteopathic Medicine of the Pacific, Pomona, California 
Article Information
The Somatic Connection   |   May 2016
Spinal Mobilization Has Peripheral Vasodilation Effects
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2016, Vol. 116, 327. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.067
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 2016, Vol. 116, 327. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.067
Zegarra-Parodi R, Pazdernik V, Roustit M, Park PY, Degenhardt BF. Effects of pressure applied during standardized spinal mobilizations on peripheral skin blood flow: a randomized cross-over study. Man Ther. 2016;220-226. doi:10.1016/j.math.2015.08.008. 
Osteopathic physicians who use spinal manipulation claim that it can improve skin blood flow (SBF), but there are few randomized, sham-controlled, cross-over research studies that have evaluated this claim. Researchers at A.T. Still University in Kirksville, Missouri, and at the Grenoble University in France investigated this claim using laser Doppler flowmetry and the inspiratory gap (IG) test to evaluate SBF during and after application of spinal mobilization (SM) and the Novel Pliance-X system pressure monitor to evaluate the influence of pressure on SBF. 
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