Medical Education  |   April 2016
Osteopathic Medical Education and Social Accountability
Author Notes
  • From the University of the Incarnate Word in San Antonio, Texas. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Robyn Phillips-Madson, DO, MPH, University of the Incarnate Word, 4301 Broadway, CPO 121, San Antonio, TX 78209-6318. E-mail: rmadson@uiwtx.edu
     
Article Information
Medical Education
Medical Education   |   April 2016
Osteopathic Medical Education and Social Accountability
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 2016, Vol. 116, 202-206. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.044
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 2016, Vol. 116, 202-206. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.044
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1
Abstract

The public’s trust in physicians continues to decline. As a way to begin regaining this trust, stakeholders, including physicians, medical educators, patient advocacy groups, and community-based organizations, have called for medical education to meet societal health needs, particularly the needs of those members who are most vulnerable, by incorporating social accountability into the medical school curriculum. The unique attributes of the osteopath-ic medical profession provide an enabling and conducive environment for broader social accountability in the health care system. Osteopathic medical schools must actively safeguard the profession’s unequivocal commitment to producing healers that are fiduciaries for their patients, communities, and populations at large.

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