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Supplement Article  |   October 1999
Asthma and gastroesophageal reflux
Article Information
Supplement Article   |   October 1999
Asthma and gastroesophageal reflux
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, October 1999, Vol. 99, S9-S13. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1999.99.10.S9
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, October 1999, Vol. 99, S9-S13. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1999.99.10.S9
Abstract

Gastroesophageal reflux and asthma are common diseases in the developed world, and they often coexist in patients. Animal experiments, epidemiologic data, and clinical studies suggest that gastroesophageal reflux may contribute to the pathogenesis of asthma. In addition to classic reflux symptoms, such patients may notice nightly exacerbations of asthma or postprandial worsening of their pulmonary symptoms. Empiric treatment with an acid-suppressive regimen is the most cost-effective approach for asthmatic patients with classic gastroesophageal reflux symptoms, especially if the asthma remains poorly controlled despite conventional treatment. If patients have persistent problems after an adequate duration of acid-suppressive therapy or if they report symptoms indicating complicated reflux disease, such as dysphagia, additional diagnostic studies should be initiated. In most cases, medical therapy should be chosen for the long-term treatment of patients with asthma and gastroesophageal reflux. With the availability of less-invasive laparoscopic surgery, fundoplication may be an alternative in selected, mostly young individuals who have documented reflux and symptoms responsive to appropriate acid-suppressive regimens.