In My View  |   February 2016
Single Accreditation System for Graduate Medical Education: An Opportunity for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Education Integration in Osteopathic Medicine
Author Notes
  • From A.T. Still University–Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine in Missouri (Student Doctor Lapinski) and Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine in Rochester, Michigan (Dr Diaz). Dr Diaz is chair of the Association of American Medical Colleges’ Committee on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Sex Development. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Jessica Lapinski, OMS IV, A.T. Still University–Kirksville College of Osteopathic Medicine, 800 W Jefferson St, Kirksville, MO 63501-1443. E-mail: jlapinski@atsu.edu
     
Article Information
Medical Education / Preventive Medicine / Graduate Medical Education
In My View   |   February 2016
Single Accreditation System for Graduate Medical Education: An Opportunity for Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, and Transgender Health Education Integration in Osteopathic Medicine
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2016, Vol. 116, 76-78. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.018
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2016, Vol. 116, 76-78. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.018
Osteopathic medical schools educate 1 in 4 medical students in the United States and train a high percentage of physicians who eventually specialize in primary care fields.1 Osteopathic physicians have been noted to have a strong history of serving underserved areas and providing compassionate, patient-centered care.2 Thus, they fill critical health care needs and treat patients of various races/ethnicities, ages, sex, sexual orientations, gender identities, abilities, and socioeconomic statuses. Treating these diverse populations in a culturally competent manner requires additional training and education. Given the increased societal awareness of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) issues, the osteopathic medical profession should strive to include more diversity efforts as they relate to this patient population. Such efforts might include ensuring basic medical knowledge (eg, risk factors, incidence rates) pertaining to a given population, cultivating a campus culture of inclusion and exposure to diverse populations, and promoting awareness through the recognition of diversity. 
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