Clinical Images  |   February 2016
Pneumorrhachis
Author Notes
  • From the Department of Pulmonary/Critical Care at the Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine in Stratford, New Jersey (Drs Kirkham and Schiers) and the Kennedy University Hospital of Osteopathic Medicine in Washington Township, New Jersey (Dr Schiers). Dr Kirkham is currently a pulmonary/critical care fellow. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Kelly A. Schiers, DO, Rowan University School of Osteopathic Medicine, 42 E Laurel Rd, Suite 3100, Stratford, NJ 08084-1354. E-mail: schierka@rowan.edu
     
Article Information
Imaging / Pulmonary Disorders / Clinical Images
Clinical Images   |   February 2016
Pneumorrhachis
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2016, Vol. 116, 119. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.027
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2016, Vol. 116, 119. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.027
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2
A 21-year-old man with a history of asthma and albuterol noncompliance presented to the emergency department with chest pain and shortness of breath. He reported 2 days of wheezing and coughing episodes. On arrival, his vital signs were normal, but auscultation revealed bilateral wheezing. A chest radiograph revealed subcutaneous emphysema and pneumopericardium (image A, arrows). A subsequent computed tomographic image showed pneumorrhachis (image B, arrow), a rare but generally benign phenomenon of intraspinal air. The patient was observed for 48 hours to monitor for complications and discharged with suggested pulmonary follow-up after 1 week. 
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