Case Report  |   February 2016
Abdominal Trigger Points and Psychological Function
Author Notes
  • From South Mississippi State Hospital in Purvis (Dr Reeves); the William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Hattiesburg, Mississippi (Dr Reeves); the G.V. (Sonny) Montgomery VA Medical Center in Jackson, Mississippi (Dr Ladner); and the University of Mississippi School of Medicine in Jackson (Dr Ladner). 
  •  *Address correspondence to Roy R. Reeves, DO, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, South Mississippi State Hospital, 823 Highway 589, Purvis, MS 39475-4194. E-mail: rreeves@smsh.state.ms.us
     
Article Information
Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Pain Management/Palliative Care / Psychiatry
Case Report   |   February 2016
Abdominal Trigger Points and Psychological Function
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2016, Vol. 116, 114-117. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.025
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 2016, Vol. 116, 114-117. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.025
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4
Abstract

Myofascial trigger points (TPs) are a poorly understood phenomenon involving the myofascial system and its related neural, lymphatic, and circulatory elements. Compression or massage of a TP causes localized pain and may cause referred pain and autonomic phenomena. The authors describe a 58-year-old woman who experienced precipitation of substantial psychological symptoms directly related to her treatment for a lower abdominal TP. Her symptoms resolved after 2 weeks of receiving high-velocity, low-amplitude manipulation and soft tissue massage. Particularly in the abdomen, TPs may be associated with psychological reactions as well as physical aspects of bodily function.

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