SURF  |   January 2016
Determining the Feasibility of Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Humans With Placental-Derived Stem Cells
Author Notes
  • From the Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale, Florida (Student Doctors Levy and Iorio), and Z Urology in Coral Springs, Florida (Ms Marchand, Ms Cassini, and Dr Zahalsky). 
  •  *Address correspondence to Michael P. Zahalsky, MD, 5850 Coral Ridge Dr, Suite 106, Coral Springs, FL 33076-3379. E-mail: mikezmd@yahoo.com
     
Article Information
Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Psychiatry / Urological Disorders
SURF   |   January 2016
Determining the Feasibility of Managing Erectile Dysfunction in Humans With Placental-Derived Stem Cells
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2016, Vol. 116, e1-e5. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.007
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2016, Vol. 116, e1-e5. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2016.007
Abstract

Introduction: Stem cell therapy is thought to improve wound healing and promote vasculogenesis and has also been investigated as a treatment for patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), which is usually caused by a microvascular disease such as diabetes mellitus or hypertension.

Objective: To determine the feasibility and effects of using placental matrix−derived mesenchymal stem cells (PM-MSCs) in the treatment of patients with ED.

Methods: Participants were recruited from a private practice urology in Coral Springs, Florida. Each patient received an injection of PM-MSCs and was followed up with at 6 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months to assess peak systolic velocity (PSV), end diastolic velocity, stretched penile length, penile width, and erectile function status based on the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire.

Results: Eight patients were injected with PM-MSCs. At the 6-week follow-up, PSV ranged from 25.5 cm/s to 56.5 cm/s; at 3 months, PSV ranged from 32.5 cm/s to 66.7 cm/s. Using unpaired t tests, the increase in PSV was statistically significant (P<.05). At 6 months, PSV ranged from 50.7 cm/s to 73.9 cm/s (P<.01). Changes in measured end diastolic velocity, stretched penile length, penile width, and International Index of Erectile Function scores were not statistically significant. At the 6-week follow-up, 2 patients for whom previous oral therapies failed had the ability to sustain erections on their own. At the 3-month follow-up, 1 additional patient was able to achieve erections on his own.

Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is one of the first human studies to report on the feasibility of using stem cell therapy to treat patients with ED. The results indicate that this treatment may be beneficial, and further investigations with larger sample sizes should be conducted. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02398370)

Subscribe to view more

For full access to this article, log in to an existing user account, purchase an annual subscription, or purchase a short-term subscription.

Order a subscription

Subscribe

Pay Per View

Entire Journal
30-Day Access

$30.00

Buy Now

This Issue
7-Day Access

$15.00

Buy Now

This article
24-Hour Access

$5.00

Buy Now

Sign In Or Create an account

Please sign in using your Osteopathic.org login.
If you do not have an AOA login, you may create a new account.

Or Subscribe