SURF  |   November 2015
Development of Peer Tutoring Services to Support Osteopathic Medical Students’ Academic Success
Author Notes
  • From the William Carey University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Hattiesburg, Mississippi. Dr Swindle is a resident at Aria Health in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 
  • A poster of this study was presented at the 2014 American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Annual Conference held April 2-5, 2014, in Washington, DC. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Nicholas Swindle, DO, 126 Woodglen Dr, Gulfport, MS 39507-1901. E-mail: nswindle205694@student.wmcarey.edu
     
Article Information
Medical Education
SURF   |   November 2015
Development of Peer Tutoring Services to Support Osteopathic Medical Students’ Academic Success
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, November 2015, Vol. 115, e14-e19. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2015.140
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, November 2015, Vol. 115, e14-e19. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2015.140
Abstract

Context: Peer tutoring can benefit both tutors and tutored students, but information is lacking regarding establishing and measuring outcomes of such a program at new medical schools.

Objective: To examine the outcomes of a pilot peer tutoring initiative and explore the implications for long-term program development.

Methods: Fifty-one osteopathic medical students who participated in a pilot peer tutoring program during the 2013-2014 academic year were surveyed regarding satisfaction with the program. Course grade means for the tutors (all courses) and tutored students (specific courses) were analyzed before and after participating in the tutoring experience. Data analyses were performed using frequency distributions, t tests, and qualitative assessment of emergent themes.

Results: The survey had a 76% response rate (39 of 51 students). Both tutored students and tutors were satisfied with the tutoring program. Statistically significant changes in course grades for the tutored courses were noted at 3 to 4 and 8 to 9 months among the tutored students who were most at risk for failure (P=.001). Tutor course grades showed no significant changes for any of the courses in which they were enrolled (P=.445).

Conclusion: Learning gains were realized by the students at greatest academic risk. Additional research is needed to evaluate long-term outcomes.

Subscribe to view more

For full access to this article, log in to an existing user account, purchase an annual subscription, or purchase a short-term subscription.

Order a subscription

Subscribe

Pay Per View

Entire Journal
30-Day Access

$30.00

Buy Now

This Issue
7-Day Access

$15.00

Buy Now

This article
24-Hour Access

$5.00

Buy Now

Sign In Or Create an account

Please sign in using your Osteopathic.org login.
If you do not have an AOA login, you may create a new account.

Or Subscribe