SURF  |   October 2015
Effects of Stem Cell Treatment in Human Patients With Peyronie Disease
Author Notes
  • From the Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale, Florida (Student Doctors Levy and Iorio and Dr Zahalsky) and Z Urology in Coral Springs, Florida (Ms Marchand, Mr Zribi, and Dr Zahalsky). 
  •  *Address correspondence to Michael P. Zahalsky, MD, 5850 Coral Ridge Dr, Coral Springs, FL 33076-3378. E-mail: mikezmd@yahoo.com
     
Article Information
Urological Disorders
SURF   |   October 2015
Effects of Stem Cell Treatment in Human Patients With Peyronie Disease
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, October 2015, Vol. 115, e8-e13. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2015.124
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, October 2015, Vol. 115, e8-e13. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2015.124
Abstract

Context: Peyronie disease (PD) is a connective tissue disorder involving the formation of fibrous plaques in the tunica albuginea. Abnormal plaques and scar tissue create a chronic state of inflammation, causing increased curvature of the penis as well as erectile dysfunction.

Objective: To determine the feasibility and effects of using placental matrix–derived mesenchymal stem cells (PM-MSCs) in the management of PD.

Methods: In a prospective study, patients with PD were injected with PM-MSCs, and followed up at 6-week, 3-month, and 6-month intervals to assess changes in plaque volume, penile curvature, and erectile function status (measured using peak systolic velocity, end-diastolic velocity, and the International Index of Erectile Function questionnaire).

Results: In the 5 patients enrolled in the study, statistically significant increases in peak systolic velocity occurred after PM-MSC injection (P<.01). Of a total of 10 plaques managed, 7 had disappeared completely at 3-month follow-up. Changes in end-diastolic velocity, stretched penile length, and penile girth were not statistically significant.

Conclusion: To our knowledge, this study is the first on the use of stem cells to manage PD in humans. The results suggest that PM-MSCs may be beneficial and effective as a nonsurgical treatment in patients with PD. Future studies with long-term follow-up in a larger sample of patients are warranted. (ClinicalTrials.gov number NCT02395029)

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