In My View  |   October 2015
Interstate Medical Licensure Compact: Pernicious Myths and Inescapable Facts
Author Notes
  • During the development of the Interstate Medical Licensure Compact (IMLC), Mr Maresh served as the Executive Director of the Washington Board of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery (BOMS), on the Board of Directors of the Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB), and as Past President (ex officio) on the Board of Directors of Administrators in Medicine (AIM). The IMLC does not necessarily reflect the views of, nor has it been formally endorsed by, the FSMB or AIM. The Washington BOMS has formally endorsed the IMLC, but it has not been endorsed by, nor does it necessarily reflect the views of, the Washington Department of Health (DOH) or any government agency of the State of Washington. The IMLC is not a formal work product of the FSMB, AIM, the Washington DOH or any government agency of the State of Washington, or the Washington BOMS. The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the FSMB, AIM, the Washington DOH or any government agency of the State of Washington, or the Washington BOMS. 
  •  *Address correspondence to Blake T. Maresh, MPA, CMBE, PO Box 6005, Olympia, WA, 98507-6005. E-mail: btmaresh@gmail.com
     
Article Information
Professional Issues
In My View   |   October 2015
Interstate Medical Licensure Compact: Pernicious Myths and Inescapable Facts
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, October 2015, Vol. 115, 588-590. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2015.119
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, October 2015, Vol. 115, 588-590. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2015.119
For decades, states have authorized boards of physicians, members of the public, and sometimes other health care professionals. to license and regulate the practice of medicine. This licensing practice is consistent with the principles of the 10th Amendment of the US Constitution, which reserves powers that are not federally enumerated to state oversight. That said, with more participants in the health care marketplace today, new applications of technology in medical practice and changing consumer demands, the physician-patient relationship seems destined to evolve. Consequently, our regulatory framework must similarly adapt, preserving the longstanding practices and the authority of medical licensing boards while embracing new tools and a new mindset. 
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