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Corrections  |   August 2015
Corrections
Article Information
Corrections   |   August 2015
Corrections
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2015, Vol. 115, 481. doi:
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 2015, Vol. 115, 481. doi:
The JAOA and the authors regret several errors that appeared in the following article: 
Yeykal JM, Stausmire JM, Ahmed MY, Pai A. Right hemicolectomy in a severely anemic Jehovah’s Witness patient with an extremely low preoperative hemoglobin level and the decision to operate [case report]. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2014;114(12):930-935. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2014.180. 
First, on page 931, the authors correctly stated the patient agreed to accept fresh frozen plasma (FFP), which is an unacceptable blood product for a Jehovah’s Witness. However, on page 933, the authors incorrectly included FFP as an acceptable treatment option in 2 separate paragraphs. The statement “If the patient is coagulopathic, then FFP, coagulation factor VIIa, and aminocaproic acid can be used in addition to oral or intravenous vitamin K” should have omitted FFP, as follows: “If the patient is coagulopathic, then coagulation factor VIIa and aminocaproic acid can be used in addition to oral or intravenous vitamin K.” Likewise, the statements… 

Autotransfusion and blood subproducts such as FFP, cryoprecipitate, clotting factors, and albumin are considered by the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania, the governing body of the Jehovah’s Witnesses, to be the personal choice of each individual to receive or refuse.19 Individuals decide for themselves whether or not these products are in accordance with their religious beliefs.

 
…should have appeared as follows: 

Autotransfusion and blood subproducts such as cryoprecipitate, clotting factors, and albumin are considered by the Watch Tower Bible and Tract Society of Pennsylvania, the governing body of the Jehovah’s Witnesses, to be the personal choice of each individual to receive or refuse.19 Individuals decide for themselves whether or not these products are in accordance with their religious beliefs. Fresh frozen plasma (FFP) remains a forbidden blood product.

 
Second, on page 932, the authors discussed their inability to locate officially recognized no-blood advance directive forms. Although these forms are not publically available to non–Jehovah’s Witnesses, they are privately available to members within their own churches. Members are encouraged to complete and carry these forms in their wallets, and medical institutions are encouraged to copy them and keep them with the patient’s medical record. 
Finally, on page 931 the statement “The Jehovah’s Witness Hospital Liaison Committee physician members supported the use of FFP in this case because the patient was already receiving plasma fraction products” was incorrect and should have been omitted. 
These corrections will be made to the electronic files online.