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Editorial  |   January 2013
A New Look for The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
Author Notes
  • From the American Osteopathic Association in Chicago, Illinois. Ms Lang is the director of the Division of Publications in the Department of Communications, and Dr D'Alonzo is the editor in chief. Dr D'Alonzo is also a pulmonologist and intensivist at Temple University Hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 
  • Address correspondence to Diane Berneath Lang, BS, American Osteopathic Association, 142 E Ontario St, Chicago, IL 60611-2864. E-mail: dlang@osteopathic.org  
Article Information
Evidence-Based Medicine / Medical Education / Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders / Pediatrics
Editorial   |   January 2013
A New Look for The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2013, Vol. 113, 6. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2012.113.1.6
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, January 2013, Vol. 113, 6. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2012.113.1.6
Web of Science® Times Cited: 41
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association (JAOA) has documented the research and opinions of the osteopathic medical profession since 1901. Over the past 112 years, thousands of JAOA articles have provided readers with the information and perspectives they need to care for their patients. 
But just as the profession of osteopathic medicine has continued to evolve, so too has our principal scholarly journal. In the past 3 years alone, 3 new sections have been introduced in The Journal; these sections provide not only clinical, data-driven information to help you care for your patients (“Evidence-Based Clinical Reviews”), but also images that showcase common medical conditions and provide meaningful learning opportunities (“Clinical Images”) and essays and poems that reflect your experiences as an osteopathic medical student or osteopathic physician (“In Your Words”). In addition, some “under the hood” improvements have taken place, such as the implementation of a Web-based manuscript tracking system. 
After adding these new areas of content and implementing the online manuscript tracking system, we thought it was time to take a look at the appearance and organization of The Journal itself. We evaluated the design of the JAOA, considered the importance of each element (eg, titles, tables, figures) in the articles, and posed questions such as the following to other key stakeholders:
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    Does the current design reflect the scholarly intent?
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    Are the tables designed to ensure the message is transparent?
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    Are the sizes of graphics in the figures appropriate?
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    Is the organization of each issue self-evident?
With responses to these questions in hand, the AOA designers embarked on a complete redesign of The Journal. They created mock-ups of their ideas, and the following 5 elements—as well as the use of color in these elements—stood out as being particularly important to the overall design: type-face, page layout, tables, figures, and overall organization of the content. 
The front cover was the first element to be finalized; the cover design introduces the reader to the look and feel that runs throughout the JAOA. The previous typefaces used for The Journal were Palatino and Frutiger, which over the years became cumbersome to use. The new typefaces, Times and Arial, translate easily between standard personal computers and Mac computers. The overall cover design features white space and a sleek typeface for the abbreviated table of contents. 
The interior design followed from the cover design. The overall look is designed to enhance readability. A theme throughout the JAOA is the abundance of white space. For example, the widths of columns were adjusted to allow for more white space in the outside margins. These margins can be used when needed to accommodate larger tables and figures. To enhance the white space, we changed to a brighter paper. 
In addition, content in The Journal has been reorganized by type and separated by color-coded sections. All issues in a particular volume also will be color coded, so that finding a particular print issue on your shelf will be easier than in the past. 
The Chicago Manual of Style notes that “because the designer designs not for specific text but for categories of text—article title, author's name, text, heads, subheads, and such—the design of a journal should be simple and flexible as well as being visually pleasing and easy to read.”1 
Welcome to your new JAOA. 
Reference
Reference
The University of Chicago Press. The Chicago Manual of Style. 16 th ed. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press; 2010:47.