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Original Contribution  |   July 1999
Osteopathic family physicians' attitudes, knowledge, and self-reported practices regarding obesity
Article Information
Original Contribution   |   July 1999
Osteopathic family physicians' attitudes, knowledge, and self-reported practices regarding obesity
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 1999, Vol. 99, 358-365. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1999.99.7.358
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 1999, Vol. 99, 358-365. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1999.99.7.358
Abstract

The study's purpose was to examine attitudes, knowledge, and self-reported practices of osteopathic family physicians regarding obesity. A survey was developed and administered to osteopathic family physicians. Respondents were predominantly male (76%), and their mean age was 44.6 years. Most had been in practice for fewer than 10 years. Physicians surveyed used diet, exercise, and behavior modification most often in treating obese patients. They were reluctant to suggest medications for treatment of obesity. The physicians also displayed a lack of understanding of the proper assessment of obese patients. These family physicians admitted that medical journals and continuing education were their major sources of information about obesity. Most agreed that their medical school training was deficient in regard to the treatment of obesity, but a majority wished further training. Most of the physicians surveyed had a desire to collaborate on obesity-related research projects. These trends appeared not to be related to physician gender, age, years in practice, or weight. The results of this survey indicated that osteopathic family physicians desire to be updated on current research regarding obesity and use of interdisciplinary modalities. Additional access to training could make an impact on these attitudes and thereby influence their patient management.