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Medical Education  |   April 1999
Visualization technology in medical education
Article Information
Medical Education   |   April 1999
Visualization technology in medical education
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 1999, Vol. 99, 211-214. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1999.99.4.211
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 1999, Vol. 99, 211-214. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1999.99.4.211
Abstract

Visualization technology offers the possibility of profoundly changing the way in which osteopathic medical students assimilate basic osteopathic principles by giving them the ability to interactively explore biomechanical components of the musculoskeletal system, and to investigate the effects that changes in physical properties can have on functionality. The authors are developing a multiple-volume series of computer-assisted learning modules that use three-dimensional, visualization technology to enhance the acquisition of knowledge and skills necessary for clinical evaluation and treatment of the lumbar and cervical spines. These materials, designed to serve as an adjunct to teaching strategies that faculty are currendy using, are available to students on campus through the Kobiljak Resource Center at Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine (MSUCOM) and via the Internet (http://hal.binl.msu.edulEdTech) to individuals and groups who are physically removed from the Michigan State University campus. In addition to addressing needs in undergraduate and graduate medical education, these osteopathic materials, delivered to users via CD-ROM, have been approved for obtaining Category 1-B CME credits (http://hal.bim.msu.edulcme).Itis anticipated that the use of these materials will facilitate understanding of static and dynamic relationships among physical components of the musculoskeletal system, thus contributing to ongoing efforts to develop and maintain physician, faculty, and student expertise in areas that are uniquely osteopathic. Although initial efforts were restricted to the cervical and lumbar spines, future modules will include other regions of the body. The ultimate goal is to enable students to visualize the effects of pathologic processes as they interactively control an articulation in three-dimensional space.