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Articles  |   September 1998
Itraconazole in the treatment of superficial cutaneous and mucosal Candida infections
Article Information
Articles   |   September 1998
Itraconazole in the treatment of superficial cutaneous and mucosal Candida infections
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 1998, Vol. 98, 497. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1998.98.9.497
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 1998, Vol. 98, 497. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1998.98.9.497
Abstract

Superficial cutaneous and mucosal Candida infections are common and widely affect both the immunocompromised as well as the immunocompetent populations. Common infections may include Candida paronychia, cutaneous candidiasis, oral candidiasis, vulvovaginal candidiasis, and Candida onychomycosis. Although C albicans has been considered to be the most common pathogen, other Candida species have emerged as potential causes of certain infections. Currently, a variety of antifungal agents is available to treat these infections. They include fluconazole, ketoconazole, and itraconazole. These agents have been widely used to treat fungal infections, including superficial and systemic candidiasis. However, some concerns exist regarding safety associated with long-term use of ketoconazole, and emerging issues of Candida resistance to fluconazole in some patient subsets have been reported. Itraconazole has proven efficacy in treating cutaneous and mucosal Candida infections. Additionally, studies have demonstrated that itraconazole may have increased efficacy and an excellent safety profile when administered in a pulse-dose, or intermittent fashion, for superficial mycotic infections. Itraconazole is an effective agent that warrants consideration when selecting treatment for Candida infections.