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Case Report  |   February 1997
Delusional parasitosis: a practical guide for the family practitioner in evaluation and treatment strategies
Article Information
Case Report   |   February 1997
Delusional parasitosis: a practical guide for the family practitioner in evaluation and treatment strategies
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 1997, Vol. 97, 95. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1997.97.2.95
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, February 1997, Vol. 97, 95. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1997.97.2.95
Web of Science® Times Cited: 41
Abstract

Delusional parasitosis (DP) is a psychiatric syndrome in which the patient falsely believes he or she is infested with parasites despite clear evidence to the contrary. Patients with DP generally think that mites, lice, or other insects have invaded their skin and most frequently seek treatment from dermatologists or family practitioners. These patients are usually reluctant to seek psychiatric care or to accept a referral to a psychiatrist. This article provides a comprehensive biopsychosocial understanding of the complexities of DP and suggests a practical strategy for evaluation and treatment by the family practitioner. Treatment with antipsychotic drugs, such as pimozide, is discussed as is a treatment team approach involving a psychiatrist, dermatologist, and family practitioner.