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Articles  |   July 1997
An osteopathic prescription for medical education reform: Part 1. Curriculum and infrastructure
Article Information
Articles   |   July 1997
An osteopathic prescription for medical education reform: Part 1. Curriculum and infrastructure
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 1997, Vol. 97, 403. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1997.97.7.403
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, July 1997, Vol. 97, 403. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1997.97.7.403
Abstract

Medical education has not kept pace with the evolving healthcare system. Criticism from industry and policy observers focuses on four major areas requiring reform: the curriculum, the fragmented educational infrastructure, the specialist-to-generalist mix, and the alienation from community and public health. The dominance of managed care organizations in the delivery and financing of healthcare is forcing a new set of physician competencies to the fore and changing projections of physician manpower and specialty needs. The authors address the four major criticisms from a uniquely osteopathic point-of-view. In this first of two articles, the authors describe the evolving osteopathic medical education model, and then employ a medical analogy to diagnose the causes of and propose treatments for curricular issues and infrastructure fragmentation. In the second article of the pair, they explore the causes of and propose strategies to address the generalist-to-specialist imbalance and the alienation of medicine from community and public health; the article also explores the role of technology in support of reform. In each article, the authors propose treatments to correct the problems in the osteopathic medical education model, and conclude that the profession is well-positioned to lead medical education reform.