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Articles  |   March 1993
Thoracic outlet syndrome--a myofascial variant: Part 3. Structural and postural considerations
Article Information
Articles   |   March 1993
Thoracic outlet syndrome--a myofascial variant: Part 3. Structural and postural considerations
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 1993, Vol. 93, 334. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1993.93.3.334
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 1993, Vol. 93, 334. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1993.93.3.334
Abstract

Thoracic outlet syndrome involves more than just local neurovascular compression. Myofascial release treatments and stretching exercises may be only partially or temporarily successful unless all related components of somatic dysfunction, including craniosacral mechanisms, are addressed. Structural and postural abnormalities in the frontal plane, as with a short leg, and in the sagittal plane, such as lumbopelvic imbalances, as well as neural involvement all contribute to thoracic outlet syndrome symptoms. Once segmental restrictions are treated and symptoms diminish, postural correction and strengthening exercises may be initiated. Osteopathic diagnosis and treatment of the local, regional, and remote structural problems is necessary for optimal treatment of thoracic outlet syndrome and the maintenance of a symptom-free status.