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Articles  |   September 1993
Quantifying passive resistance to motion in the straight-leg-raising test on asymptomatic subjects
Article Information
Articles   |   September 1993
Quantifying passive resistance to motion in the straight-leg-raising test on asymptomatic subjects
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 1993, Vol. 93, 913. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1993.93.9.913
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, September 1993, Vol. 93, 913. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1993.93.9.913
Abstract

The clinician needs an objective way to measure limb motion in the straight-leg-raising test. A biomechanical algorithm was used to quantify resistance to motion in 15 asymptomatic subjects. Measurements from a pendulum electrogoniometer and hand-held load cell were used to calculate a moment representing passive resistance to motion. After three measurement trials, significant increases in range of motion (4.7%) and moment (8.4%) occurred. Then, an isometric contraction-relaxation of the hip extensors produced a highly significant increase in motion (8.8%) but decrease in moment (< 14.3%). A third order polynomial fit of moment per angle stratified the sample into two groups according to their change in moment. Motion in group 1 increased 8.0%, and in group 2, 9.5%. However, group 1 had no change in moment whereas group 2 had a highly significant decrease in moment (22.9%). The measured change in resistance demonstrated that a simple biomechanical algorithm quantified properties in a clinical test that were not observed in range of motion alone.