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Articles  |   August 1992
Male breast carcinoma: clinical experience in a suburban community
Article Information
Articles   |   August 1992
Male breast carcinoma: clinical experience in a suburban community
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 1992, Vol. 92, 1005. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1992.92.8.1005
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, August 1992, Vol. 92, 1005. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1992.92.8.1005
Abstract

Male breast cancer is difficult to study because it occurs infrequently, accounting for 1% of all breast carcinoma. Breast cancer occurs 10 years later in men than in women, and its presentation parallels that in women. The authors retrospectively review 13 cases of male breast cancer occurring over a 20-year period in four community hospitals. Treatment methods paralleled those used for female cancer patients. Surgery, primarily radical mastectomy, was performed in all patients. In the eight patients in whom hormone receptor assays were obtained, all tests were positive for estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors, or both. Metastases were diagnosed in five patients during follow-up. The longest disease-free survival has been 10 years. Similarities and differences regarding male and female breast cancer are discussed as are the diagnosis and management of men with this disease.