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Clinical Trials  |   April 1992
Office diagnosis of lower extremity venous insufficiency and treatment with the use of nonprescription support hose
Article Information
Clinical Trials   |   April 1992
Office diagnosis of lower extremity venous insufficiency and treatment with the use of nonprescription support hose
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 1992, Vol. 92, 459. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1992.92.4.459
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 1992, Vol. 92, 459. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1992.92.4.459
Abstract

A two-part crossover study assessed the efficacy of nonprescription support pantyhose by evaluating the relative performance of sheer- versus firm-support types in 30 women with lower extremity complaints. In this clinical trial, 23 women wore nonprescription firm-support pantyhose and seven wore sheer-support pantyhose during the initial 4-week treatment period. Next, treatment was discontinued for 2 weeks, after which a 4-week crossover trial was started. During the crossover, the 23 women who had worn the firm-support hose during the initial trial wore the sheer-support hose, and the seven who had worn the sheer-support hose switched to wearing the firm-support hose. The 2-week washout period did not prove sufficient to allow measured values to return to baseline, thus invalidating the crossover comparisons between the sheer- and firm-support pantyhose. However, the direct comparison of results showed that patients generally experienced an improvement in venous circulation by using either firm- or sheer-support hose as evaluated by venous index measurements and a corresponding decrease in subjective complaints. One year after this study was completed, the patients were recalled. Of the 25 who were seen at this follow-up, 91% continued to use support hose, either when they had symptoms or on a regular daily basis. Venous circulation, as evaluated by noninvasive Doppler ultrasound and photoplethysmography, remained improved.