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Articles  |   May 1992
Parietal bone mobility in the anesthetized cat
Article Information
Articles   |   May 1992
Parietal bone mobility in the anesthetized cat
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 1992, Vol. 92, 599. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1992.92.5.599
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, May 1992, Vol. 92, 599. doi:10.7556/jaoa.1992.92.5.599
Abstract

To quantify parietal bone motion in reference to the medial sagittal suture, a newly developed instrument was attached to the surgically exposed skull of anesthetized adult cats. The instrument differentiated between lateral and rotational parietal bone movements around the fulcrum of the suture. Bone movement was produced by external forces applied to the skull and by changes in intracranial pressure associated with induced hypercapnia, intravenous injections of norepinephrine, and controlled injections of artificial cerebrospinal fluid into the lateral cerebral ventricle. Responses varied considerably among test animals. Generally, lateral head compression caused sagittal suture closure, small inward rotation of the parietal bones, increased intraventricular pressure, transient apnea, and unstable systemic arterial blood pressure. Graded increases in intracranial volume produced stepped increases in pressure, lateral expansion at the sagittal suture, and outward rotation of the parietal bones. We attribute variations in animal response largely to differences in intracranial and suture compliance among them. Cranial suture compliance may be an important factor in defining total cranial compliance.