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Letters to the Editor  |   June 2014
Effect of Inpatient Electroencephalography on Clinical Decision Making: EEG Is More Valuable Than Findings Suggest
Author Affiliations
  • Viroj Wiwanitkit, MD (hons)
    Visiting professor, Hainan Medical University, China; Visiting professor, University of Nis, Serbia
Article Information
Neuromusculoskeletal Disorders
Letters to the Editor   |   June 2014
Effect of Inpatient Electroencephalography on Clinical Decision Making: EEG Is More Valuable Than Findings Suggest
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, June 2014, Vol. 114, 426. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2014.092
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, June 2014, Vol. 114, 426. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2014.092
To the Editor: 
I found the recent report by Harmon and colleagues on inpatient electroencephalography (EEG) very interesting.1 The authors concluded that “inpatient EEGs rarely contributed to clinical decision making and in no case resulted in a change in diagnosis or management.”1 Thus, the question that remains is whether inpatient EEG is useless. In fact, the study was retrospective, and there are many factors that could not be controlled. I believe it is important to consider the rational use of investigation.2 In other words, similar to any investigation in medicine, the inpatient EEG should be used only if there is indication. Harmon and colleagues1 did not determine whether all cases had fulfilled indication. The inpatient EEG can be very useful—if the physician has been well educated on proper procedures and indications. 
References
Harmon LA, Craddock M, Jones E, Spellman CW, Loveman DM. Effect of inpatient electroencephalography on clinical decision making. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2013;113(12):891-896. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2013.067. [CrossRef] [PubMed]
Wiwanitkit V. Rational use of laboratory test and patient compliance. Chula Med J. 1999;43(6):353-360.