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Corrections  |   April 2008
Correction
Article Information
Corrections   |   April 2008
Correction
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 2008, Vol. 108, 215-217. doi:
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, April 2008, Vol. 108, 215-217. doi:
The JAOA deeply regrets that prepublication edits requested by Jane C. Johnson, MA, were not incorporated in the following article: 
Noll DR, Johnson JC, Brooks JE. Revisiting Castlio and Ferris-Swift's experiments on direct splenic stimulation in patients with acute infectious disease. J Am Osteopath Assoc. Feb 2008;108(2):71-79.  
The changes detailed below were made to the full text (http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/content/full/108/2/71) and Adobe Portable Document Format (http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/reprint/108/2/71) versions of this piece online as soon as these omissions were discovered: 
  • Page 71—In the author notes at the bottom of the page, Ms Johnson's affiliation was incorrectly shown as the Department of Family Medicine, Preventive Medicine, and Community Health at A.T. Still University-Kirksville (Mo) College of Osteopathic Medicine. Her professional affiliation is with the A.T. Still Research Institute at that institution.
  • Page 73—In the third paragraph of the first column, the last sentence read as follows in the original print publication: “The effect of varying the number of compressions was also analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis tests to compare the groups on any change from baseline levels.” The authors' hypothesis is more accurately described by replacing “any” with “the” in the sentence shown.
    In addition, the fourth paragraph of the “Results” section originally indicated incorrectly that there was a “small but statistically significant decrease in the mean percentage of endothelials, eosinophils, and basophils at 45 minutes posttreatment.” In fact, the decreases in these laboratory values did not reach statistical significance at that posttreatment interval.
  • Page 75—The original print publication included the word “Mean” at the beginning of the title for Table 3. That redundancy has been eliminated in the electronic versions of the article posted online.
    In addition, the first paragraph of the left column of text inappropriately reported that “Group 4 erythrocyte counts showed a trend toward statistical significance.” That statement should have been modified to read as follows: “Group 4 erythrocyte counts were suggestive of a change over time.”
    Finally, the next sentence in that paragraph incorrectly stated, “The Kruskal-Wallis test, also used to test for between-group differences....” The statistical test is more accurately described by removing the “also” from the phrase shown.
  • Page 76—In the original print publication, Table 4 incorrectly showed that the pooled observation time for 5+10+15 was statistically significant at P=.05. Because statistical significance was set at P<.05 for this investigation, these data should not have been identified with a footnote symbol as statistically significant.
Readers should also be aware of the following corrections to previous editions of the osteopathic medical education theme issue published by JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association: 
  • Griffin AV, Sweet S. Undergraduate osteopathic medical education: addressing the impact of college growth on the applicant pool and student enrollment. J Am Osteopath Assoc. Feb 2006;106(2):51-57.
    The American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in its Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education. Therefore, data from the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service are to be considered incomplete until confirmed by multiple editions of that publication.
    Consequently, several updates were made to Table 1 for subsequent editions of this annual JAOA contribution. The 2004-2005 data corrections noted below are for Table 1 and originally appeared in the same table on page 111 (J Am Osteopath Assoc. Mar 2007;107[3]:109-116):
     
    • Previously reported data on the number of applications received by Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine–California in Vallejo was updated from 2157 to 2156.
    • As a result, the total number of applications received has been corrected from 46,750 to 46,749.
    • The number of students enrolled at Philadelphia (Pa) College of Osteopathic Medicine has been corrected from the 1125 previously reported to 1025. (The total number of students enrolled at the nation's COMs during that academic year remains unchanged at 12,525.)
      The 2001-2003 and 2005 data corrections noted below are for Table 2 and originally appeared in the same table on page 112:
    • 2001
      – The total number of applications was reported as 7259, but has been corrected to 6898.
      – Though the number of applications reported by race/ethnicity remains unchanged, the percentages reported have been corrected as follows: Asian/Pacific Islander, 16.9% corrected to 17.8%; white (non-Hispanic), 65.2%, 68.6%; black/African American (non-Hispanic), 4.6%, 4.9%; Hispanic/Latino, 4.0%, 4.2%; Native American/Alaskan Native, 0.9%, 1.0%; and other or unknown, 3.4%, 3.6%.
    • 2002
      – Though the total number of applications reported for applicants who self-identified as Other or did not provide race/ethnicity data remains unchanged at 269, the percentage has been corrected to 4.3% from 4.2%.
    • 2003
      – The total number of applications was previously reported as 6813, but has been corrected to 6814.
      – Though the number of applicants who self-identified as Asian/Pacific Islander remains unchanged at 1201, the percentage reported has been corrected to 17.6% from 7.6%.
    • 2005
      – Most data and some percentages previously reported for this year have been corrected: (1) The total number of applications was originally reported as 8255, but has subsequently been corrected to 8258. (2) Asian/Pacific Islander was reported as 1668 and has been corrected to 1669, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (3) White (non-Hispanic) was reported as 5229 and has been corrected to 5930, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (4) Underrepresented minorities was reported as 969 (11.7%) and has been corrected to 971 (11.8%). (5) Black/African American (non-Hispanic) was reported as 491 (5.9%) and has been corrected to 492 (6.0%). (6) Hispanic/Latino was reported as 419 and has been corrected to 420, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (7) Other or Unknown was reported as 389 and has been corrected to 388, but the percentage reported remains unchanged.
  • Ramirez AF. Board certification of osteopathic physicians. J Am Osteopath Assoc. Feb 2006;106(2):77-84.
    The changes described were the result of errors in reporting. The corrections noted below are for Table 1 and originally appeared in the same table on page 120 (JAm Osteopath Assoc. Mar 2007;107[3]:117-125):
     
    • The number of general certifications awarded by the American Osteopathic Board of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation Medicine were not reported for 2002-2005. The following data should have been reported for these 4 years: 2002, 8 (1%); 2003, 6 (1%); 2004, 31 (3%); 2005, 1 (<1%).
    • Consequently, total number of general certifications awarded by osteopathic medical specialty boards should have been reported as follows: 2002, 1300; 2003, 1036; 2004, 1059; 2005, 1003.
      The corrections noted below are for Table 3 and originally appeared in the same table on page 123:
    • In 2004, 2 (1%) physicians were recertified in Neuro-radiology. Previously, no recertifications were reported in 2004 for this specialty.
    • Consequently, the total number of physician recertifications awarded by osteopathic medical specialty boards for 2004 was previously reported as 286. This number has been corrected to 288.
    • In addition, Preventive Medicine and Occupational Medicine physician recertification data from 2004 and 2005 were accidentally transposed with data for Preventive Medicine and Public Health. Although it was originally reported that there were no physician recertifications in Preventive Medicine and Occupational Medicine in either 2004 or 2005, there were actually 4 (1%) in 2004 and 1 (<1%) in 2005. Conversely, there were no physician recertifications in Preventive Medicine and Public Health for either year, instead of the 4 and 1, respectively, previously reported.
Finally, the JAOA regrets that the following typographic errors appeared in the April 2006 issue and the May 2006 issue, respectively. 
  • McCoy SJ, Beal JM, Shipman SB, Payton ME, Watson GH. Risk factors for postpartum depression: a retrospective investigation at 4-weeks postnatal and a review of the literature. J Am Osteopath Assoc. April 2006; 106(4):193-198.
    In the Table on page 195, the No and Yes column headings under “EPDS Score, ≥13” were accidentally reversed. The Yes column heading should have appeared first, at the top of the second column of data.
  • Baker HH, Cope MK, Adelman MD, Schuler S, Foster RW, Gimpel JR. Relationships between scores on the COMLEX-USA Level 2-Performance Evaluation and selected school-based performance measures. J Am Osteopath Assoc. May 2006;106(5):290-295.
    The quoted paragraph in column two on page 291 should end after “...prior to graduation.17“and the following paragraph should begin, “The validity of this examination will have an impact on graduation and licensure of all future osteopathic physicians.”
The April and May 2006 issues of the JAOA have been corrected online to reflect both changes, as noted elsewhere (J Am Osteopath Assoc. June 2006;106[6]:363). ♦