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Medical Education  |   March 2007
Undergraduate Osteopathic Medical Education
Author Notes
  • From the Division of Predoctoral Education, Department of Accreditation, American Osteopathic Association, Chicago, Ill. 
  • Address correspondence to Andrea Williams, Director, Division of Predoctoral Education, Department of Accreditation, American Osteopathic Association, 142 E Ontario St, Chicago, IL 60611-2864. E-mail: awilliams@osteopathic.org 
Article Information
Medical Education
Medical Education   |   March 2007
Undergraduate Osteopathic Medical Education
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2007, Vol. 107, 109-116. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2007.107.3.109
The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association, March 2007, Vol. 107, 109-116. doi:10.7556/jaoa.2007.107.3.109
Abstract

This article details requests from the nation's 23 accredited colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs) for class-size increases and the establishment of new COMs and branch campuses. Basic data on COM applicants and applications, matriculants, and graduates are also provided. Tuition, revenues, and expenditures at COMs are outlined.

Medical schools in the United States—whether osteopathic or allopathic—are facing similar challenges, including increasing the number of medical graduates to meet shifting demographic demands and improving the racial and ethnic diversity of the medical profession.1,2 The nation's 23 accredited colleges of osteopathic medicine (COMs) and their branch campuses have been successful in meeting both challenges while also maintaining high entrance standards for applicants (see appendix, pages 126-128).2 
The data presented in this article have been adapted from the results of a joint survey produced by the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), the AACOM/AOA Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: Academic Year 2005-06.3 In addition, AACOM's 2006-2007 Tuition Survey, as reported in that association's Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education, 2006, was also used.4 Finally, a draft of AACOM's Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education, 2004, and its historical database (SPSS 15.0 for Windows; SPSS Inc, Chicago, Ill) compiled from previous years' tuition surveys were used to prepare this article. As noted, the data reported are received mainly from AACOM. That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education. Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data is current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to the data presented. 
Increases in Class Size and the Growth of New COMs
In partial response to a projected physician shortage in coming years,5-7 many COMs have made requests to the AOA's Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA) for permanent class-size increases. From 1999 to 2006, COCA has fielded such requests from 12 COMs. When combined with one new COM and three new branch campuses, approved requests have resulted in nearly 800 additional students being admitted into COMs during the 5-year period from the 2000-2001 academic year to the 2005-2006 academic year.8 
In addition, COCA has received nine applications to establish new COMs since the 2000-2001 academic year. During the past 2 years alone, COCA has reviewed eight formal applications to open new COMs, with five receiving preaccreditation status and three receiving provisional accreditation status. 
Currently, only one COM has preaccreditation status, Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Parker, Colo.9 There are currently three COMs that have provisional accreditation status to begin instruction in 2007 (see appendix, pages 126-128): 
  • A.T. Still University-College of Osteopathic Medicine-Mesa in Arizona
  • Lincoln Memorial University-DeBusk College of Osteopathic Medicine in Harrogate, Tenn
  • Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine in New York, NY
It is likely that the growth of new COMs is related to the reported need for physicians in the United States,5-7 an increased number of highly qualified applicants,2 a need for primary care physicians to serve in certain underrepresented geographic regions,9,10 and the potential in those areas for developing community-based primary care clinical opportunities. 
Applicants and Applications: Academic Year 2005-2006
Although most COMs showed an increase in the number of applications received for the 2005-2006 academic year, representing an overall increase in applications of 8.5% from the 2004-2005 academic year (Table 1), this number represents a reduction when compared with the 16.5% increase seen previously.2 As reported in previous years,2,8,11-13 the three colleges with the most applications received were Philadelphia (Pa) College of Osteopathic Medicine, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury, and Midwestern University/Chicago College of Osteopathic Medicine in Downers Grove, Ill. The fourth and fifth most popular COMs for applications were, respectively, A.T. Still University-Kirksville (Mo) College of Osteopathic Medicine and Nova Southeastern University College of Osteopathic Medicine in Fort Lauderdale, Fla. 
Table 1
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Applications Received, First-Year Enrollment, and Total Enrollment by College *




Enrollment
Total Applications Received
First Year
Total
COM
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 2463 2621 178 (4.9) 175 (4.5) 649 (5.2) 670 (5.0)
▪ DMU-COM22792368230 (6.3)219 (5.6)808 (6.5)817 (6.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 2216 2228 239 (6.6) 251 (6.4) 926 (7.4) 940 (7.0)
▪ LECOM25602497230 (6.3)231 (5.9)863 (6.9)885 (6.6)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 2560 1746 163 (4.5) 166 (4.2) 163 (1.3) 323 (2.4)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 1685 1923 148 (4.1) 205 (5.2) 538 (4.3) 616 (4.6)
▪ MWU/AZCOM21252359148 (4.1)166 (4.2)557 (4.4)574 (4.3)
▪ MWU/CCOM 2943 3197 175 (4.8) 182 (4.7) 676 (5.4) 690 (5.1)
▪ NSU-COM22022542222 (6.1)246 (6.3)802 (6.4)822 (6.1)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 2962 3285 315 (8.6) 321 (8.2) 1151 (9.2) 1176 (8.8)
▪ OSU-COM1180123889 (2.4)93 (2.4)348 (2.8)352 (2.6)
▪ OU-COM 2125 2338 116 (3.2) 115 (2.9) 427 (3.4) 431 (3.2)
▪ PCOM35393825274 (7.5)275 (7.0)1025 (8.2)1041 (7.8)
□ GA-PCOM NA 1682 NA 83 (2.1) NA 83 (0.6)
▪ PCSOM1340147679 (2.2)80 (2.0)265 (2.1)278 (2.1)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM14831701135 (3.7)140 (3.6)501 (4.0)520 (3.9)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA21562091136 (3.7)135 (3.5)508 (4.1)533 (4.0)
□ TUNCOM 2156 1509 78 (2.1) 108 (2.8) 78 (0.6) 184 (1.4)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM1984240196 (2.6)102 (2.6)365 (2.9)384 (2.9)
▪ UNECOM 1879 2443 124 (3.4) 125 (3.2) 491 (3.9) 499 (3.7)
▪ VCOM13791673156 (4.3)160 (4.1)307 (2.5)467 (3.5)
▪ WesternU/COMP 2033 2321 207 (5.7) 219 (5.6) 710 (5.7) 724 (5.4)
▪ WVSOM 1500
1635
108 (3.0)
111 (2.8)
367 (2.9)
397 (3.0)
Total 46,749 51,099 3646 3908 12,525 13,406
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of the JAOA.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Most data shown for the 2004-2005 academic year have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding. Because most applicants apply to several COMs, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of individual applicants shown in Table 2. As noted below, the data reported are received from the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS). That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education.4 Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data are current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to AACOMAS data. Changes made to previously reported data for the 2004-2005 academic year follow.2 Data for Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton (Fla) and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson were not available at publication for the February 2006 issue of the JAOA and have been included here. Previously reported data for Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine—California in Vallejo have been updated from 2157 to 2156, and the total number of applications received has been corrected accordingly from 46,750 to 46,749. The number of students enrolled at Philadelphia (Pa) College of Osteopathic Medicine has been corrected from the 1125 previously reported2 to 1025. The total number of students enrolled at the nation's COMs during the 2004-2005 academic year remains unchanged at 12,525.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Application and enrollment data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004. Each of these branch campuses shares the applicant pool with its parent institution. As noted in the first footnote above, data for the 2004-2005 academic year were not reported in the JAOA previously.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
Table 1
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Applications Received, First-Year Enrollment, and Total Enrollment by College *




Enrollment
Total Applications Received
First Year
Total
COM
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 2463 2621 178 (4.9) 175 (4.5) 649 (5.2) 670 (5.0)
▪ DMU-COM22792368230 (6.3)219 (5.6)808 (6.5)817 (6.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 2216 2228 239 (6.6) 251 (6.4) 926 (7.4) 940 (7.0)
▪ LECOM25602497230 (6.3)231 (5.9)863 (6.9)885 (6.6)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 2560 1746 163 (4.5) 166 (4.2) 163 (1.3) 323 (2.4)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 1685 1923 148 (4.1) 205 (5.2) 538 (4.3) 616 (4.6)
▪ MWU/AZCOM21252359148 (4.1)166 (4.2)557 (4.4)574 (4.3)
▪ MWU/CCOM 2943 3197 175 (4.8) 182 (4.7) 676 (5.4) 690 (5.1)
▪ NSU-COM22022542222 (6.1)246 (6.3)802 (6.4)822 (6.1)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 2962 3285 315 (8.6) 321 (8.2) 1151 (9.2) 1176 (8.8)
▪ OSU-COM1180123889 (2.4)93 (2.4)348 (2.8)352 (2.6)
▪ OU-COM 2125 2338 116 (3.2) 115 (2.9) 427 (3.4) 431 (3.2)
▪ PCOM35393825274 (7.5)275 (7.0)1025 (8.2)1041 (7.8)
□ GA-PCOM NA 1682 NA 83 (2.1) NA 83 (0.6)
▪ PCSOM1340147679 (2.2)80 (2.0)265 (2.1)278 (2.1)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM14831701135 (3.7)140 (3.6)501 (4.0)520 (3.9)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA21562091136 (3.7)135 (3.5)508 (4.1)533 (4.0)
□ TUNCOM 2156 1509 78 (2.1) 108 (2.8) 78 (0.6) 184 (1.4)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM1984240196 (2.6)102 (2.6)365 (2.9)384 (2.9)
▪ UNECOM 1879 2443 124 (3.4) 125 (3.2) 491 (3.9) 499 (3.7)
▪ VCOM13791673156 (4.3)160 (4.1)307 (2.5)467 (3.5)
▪ WesternU/COMP 2033 2321 207 (5.7) 219 (5.6) 710 (5.7) 724 (5.4)
▪ WVSOM 1500
1635
108 (3.0)
111 (2.8)
367 (2.9)
397 (3.0)
Total 46,749 51,099 3646 3908 12,525 13,406
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of the JAOA.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Most data shown for the 2004-2005 academic year have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding. Because most applicants apply to several COMs, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of individual applicants shown in Table 2. As noted below, the data reported are received from the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS). That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education.4 Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data are current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to AACOMAS data. Changes made to previously reported data for the 2004-2005 academic year follow.2 Data for Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton (Fla) and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson were not available at publication for the February 2006 issue of the JAOA and have been included here. Previously reported data for Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine—California in Vallejo have been updated from 2157 to 2156, and the total number of applications received has been corrected accordingly from 46,750 to 46,749. The number of students enrolled at Philadelphia (Pa) College of Osteopathic Medicine has been corrected from the 1125 previously reported2 to 1025. The total number of students enrolled at the nation's COMs during the 2004-2005 academic year remains unchanged at 12,525.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Application and enrollment data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004. Each of these branch campuses shares the applicant pool with its parent institution. As noted in the first footnote above, data for the 2004-2005 academic year were not reported in the JAOA previously.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
×
When the demographic characteristics of the COM applicant pool from 2006 is compared with that of 2005, several patterns are visible, including an increase in the number of female applicants and in the number of applicants who identify themselves as belonging to a racial or ethnic minority. In fact, the percentage of women applying to COMs has increased 10 percentage points from 2001 to 2006 (3151 [43.4%] vs 4845 [53.9%]) and more than 50% of COM applications are now from women.2,13 
As noted, there was a slight increase in the number of applications to COMs from most races and ethnic origins with traditional minority status: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, and Native American/Alaskan Native (Table 2). The percentage of applications from minority groups that have been historically underrepresented in medical schools (ie, black/African American [non-Hispanic], Hispanic/Latino, and Native American/Alaskan Native) has remained steady at 11.8% [corrected from 11.7%] from 2005 to 2006, though the number of black applicants increased by 0.5% while the number of Hispanic applicants decreased by the same amount. Unfortunately, enrollment of underrepresented minority applicants has not shown an increase in recent years. First-year enrollment figures were 8.6% in 2001 and 2002, 8.3% in 2003, 8.9% in 2004, and 8.6% in 2005.4 This lack of growth perhaps demonstrates a need for COMs to develop diversity initiatives. 
Table 2
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Applicants' Self-Designated Race or Ethnic Origin, 2001-2006 *

Race

2001 (n=6898)

2002 (n=6324)

2003 (n=6814)

2004 (n=7240)

2005 (n=8258)

2006 (n=9476)
Asian/Pacific Islander1226 (17.8)1086 (17.2)1201 (17.6)1357 (18.7)1669 (20.2)1936 (20.4)
White (non-Hispanic) 4731 (68.6) 4285 (67.8) 4567 (67.0) 4725 (65.3) 5230 (63.3) 5924 (62.5)
Underrepresented Minorities§693 (10.0)684 (10.8)732 (10.7)817 (11.3)971 (11.8)1117 (11.8)
□ Black/African American (non-Hispanic) 335 (4.9) 342 (5.4) 358 (5.3) 404 (5.6) 492 (6.0) 620 (6.5)
□ Hispanic/Latino290 (4.2)287 (4.5)314 (4.6)350 (4.8)420 (5.1)434 (4.6)
□ Native American/Alaskan Native 68 (1.0) 55 (0.9) 60 (0.9) 63 (0.9) 59 (0.7) 63 (0.7)
Other or Unknown248 (3.6)269 (4.3)314 (4.6)341 (4.7)388 (4.7)499 (5.3)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of the JAOA.Sources: Data are current as of April 2007 and were provided by AACOM. Data for academic years from 2001 through 2005 have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding. Totals reported here do not include applicants who applied directly to the COMs. Nineteen COMs have participated in the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS) for all years except 2001, 2002, and 2003, during which 18 colleges participated. Since 2000 (ie, for the 2001-2002 academic year), applications submitted to the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center at Fort Worth/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM) have been processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service rather than AACOMAS, so data from that COM are not included in this table. As noted below, the data reported are received from AACOM's AACOMAS. That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education.4 Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data are current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to AACOMAS data. Changes made to previously reported data for 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2005 follow.2 For 2001, the total number of applications was reported2 as 7259, but has been corrected to 6898. In addition, though the number of applications reported by race/ethnicity remains unchanged, the percentages reported have been corrected as shown above. These percentages were reported as follows: Asian/Pacific Islander, 16.9; white (non-Hispanic), 65.2; black/African American (non-Hispanic), 4.6; Hispanic/Latino, 4.0; Native American/Alaskan Native, 0.9; and other or unknown, 3.4. For 2002, though the total number of applications reported for applicants who self-identified as Other or did not provide race/ethnicity data remains unchanged at 269, the percentage has been corrected to 4.3 from 4.2. For 2003, the total number of applications was reported2 as 6813, but has been corrected to 6814. In addition, though the number reported for Asian/Pacific Islander remains unchanged at 1201, the percentage reported has been corrected to 17.6 from 7.6. Finally, most data previously reported2 for 2005 has been corrected: (1) The total number of applications was originally reported as 8255, but has been corrected to 8258. (2) Asian/Pacific Islander was reported as 1668 and has been corrected to 1669, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (3) White (non-Hispanic) was reported as 5229 and has been corrected to 5930, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (4) Underrepresented minorities was reported as 969 (11.7) and has been corrected to 971 (11.8). (5) Black/African American (non-Hispanic) was reported as 491 (5.9) and has been corrected to 492 (6.0). (6) Hispanic/Latino was reported as 419 and has been corrected to 420, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (7) Other or Unknown was reported as 389 and has been corrected to 388, but the percentage reported remains unchanged.
 In 2003, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg, began participating in AACOMAS when it admitted its first matriculating class.
 Data reported for 2001 includes 177 applicants who applied only to TCOM, which has not participated in AACOMAS since 2000, as noted above.
 §Underrepresented minority racial/ethnic groups are comprised of students who self-identified as belonging to any of the following races: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native. Students who self-identified as white (non-Hispanic) or other, and those who chose not to disclose this demographic data are not included in this total. Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, AACOM and AOA data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard.
Table 2
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Applicants' Self-Designated Race or Ethnic Origin, 2001-2006 *

Race

2001 (n=6898)

2002 (n=6324)

2003 (n=6814)

2004 (n=7240)

2005 (n=8258)

2006 (n=9476)
Asian/Pacific Islander1226 (17.8)1086 (17.2)1201 (17.6)1357 (18.7)1669 (20.2)1936 (20.4)
White (non-Hispanic) 4731 (68.6) 4285 (67.8) 4567 (67.0) 4725 (65.3) 5230 (63.3) 5924 (62.5)
Underrepresented Minorities§693 (10.0)684 (10.8)732 (10.7)817 (11.3)971 (11.8)1117 (11.8)
□ Black/African American (non-Hispanic) 335 (4.9) 342 (5.4) 358 (5.3) 404 (5.6) 492 (6.0) 620 (6.5)
□ Hispanic/Latino290 (4.2)287 (4.5)314 (4.6)350 (4.8)420 (5.1)434 (4.6)
□ Native American/Alaskan Native 68 (1.0) 55 (0.9) 60 (0.9) 63 (0.9) 59 (0.7) 63 (0.7)
Other or Unknown248 (3.6)269 (4.3)314 (4.6)341 (4.7)388 (4.7)499 (5.3)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of the JAOA.Sources: Data are current as of April 2007 and were provided by AACOM. Data for academic years from 2001 through 2005 have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding. Totals reported here do not include applicants who applied directly to the COMs. Nineteen COMs have participated in the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS) for all years except 2001, 2002, and 2003, during which 18 colleges participated. Since 2000 (ie, for the 2001-2002 academic year), applications submitted to the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center at Fort Worth/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM) have been processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service rather than AACOMAS, so data from that COM are not included in this table. As noted below, the data reported are received from AACOM's AACOMAS. That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education.4 Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data are current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to AACOMAS data. Changes made to previously reported data for 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2005 follow.2 For 2001, the total number of applications was reported2 as 7259, but has been corrected to 6898. In addition, though the number of applications reported by race/ethnicity remains unchanged, the percentages reported have been corrected as shown above. These percentages were reported as follows: Asian/Pacific Islander, 16.9; white (non-Hispanic), 65.2; black/African American (non-Hispanic), 4.6; Hispanic/Latino, 4.0; Native American/Alaskan Native, 0.9; and other or unknown, 3.4. For 2002, though the total number of applications reported for applicants who self-identified as Other or did not provide race/ethnicity data remains unchanged at 269, the percentage has been corrected to 4.3 from 4.2. For 2003, the total number of applications was reported2 as 6813, but has been corrected to 6814. In addition, though the number reported for Asian/Pacific Islander remains unchanged at 1201, the percentage reported has been corrected to 17.6 from 7.6. Finally, most data previously reported2 for 2005 has been corrected: (1) The total number of applications was originally reported as 8255, but has been corrected to 8258. (2) Asian/Pacific Islander was reported as 1668 and has been corrected to 1669, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (3) White (non-Hispanic) was reported as 5229 and has been corrected to 5930, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (4) Underrepresented minorities was reported as 969 (11.7) and has been corrected to 971 (11.8). (5) Black/African American (non-Hispanic) was reported as 491 (5.9) and has been corrected to 492 (6.0). (6) Hispanic/Latino was reported as 419 and has been corrected to 420, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (7) Other or Unknown was reported as 389 and has been corrected to 388, but the percentage reported remains unchanged.
 In 2003, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg, began participating in AACOMAS when it admitted its first matriculating class.
 Data reported for 2001 includes 177 applicants who applied only to TCOM, which has not participated in AACOMAS since 2000, as noted above.
 §Underrepresented minority racial/ethnic groups are comprised of students who self-identified as belonging to any of the following races: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native. Students who self-identified as white (non-Hispanic) or other, and those who chose not to disclose this demographic data are not included in this total. Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, AACOM and AOA data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard.
×
Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, AOA and AACOM data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard. 
Tuition
For the 2006-2007 academic year, tuition averaged $20,276 for in-state residents in public COMs and $34,113 in private COMs. For out-of-state residents, tuition averaged $38,840 in public schools and $34,893 in private schools. 
There is a nearly even split between COMs that have a higher percentage of out-of-state residents vs state residents matriculating in the 2005-2006 academic year (Table 3). 
Table 3
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: State Residency Status of First-Year Students by College *


2004-2005

2005-2006
COM
n
Residents
Nonresidents
n
Residents
Nonresidents
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 178 37 (20.8) 141 (79.2) 175 25 (14.3) 150 (85.7)
▪ DMU-COM23056 (24.4)174 (75.7)21959 (26.9)160 (73.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 239 36 (15.1) 203 (84.9) 251 200 (79.7) 51 (20.3)
▪ LECOM23076 (33.0)154 (66.0)23173 (31.6)158 (68.4)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 163 56 (34.4) 107 (65.6) 166 58 (34.9) 108 (65.1)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 148 132 (89.2) 16 (10.8) 205 185 (90.2) 20 (9.8)
▪ MWU/AZCOM14843 (29.1)105 (70.9)16639 (23.5)127 (76.5)
▪ MWU/CCOM 175 99 (56.6) 76 (43.4) 182 74 (40.7) 108 (59.3)
▪ NSU-COM22298 (44.1)124 (55.9)246129 (52.4)117 (47.6)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 315 204 (64.8) 111 (35.2) 321 230 (71.7) 91 (28.3)
▪ OSU-COM8978 (87.6)11 (12.4)9380 (86.0)13 (14.0)
▪ OU-COM 116 101 (87.1) 15 (12.9) 115 113 (98.3) 2 (1.7)
▪ PCOM274138 (50.4)136 (49.6)275164 (59.6)111 (40.4)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA NA 83 35 (42.2) 48 (57.8)
▪ PCSOM7937 (46.8)42 (53.2)8026 (32.5)54 (67.5)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM135132 (97.8)3 (2.2)140126 (90.0)14 (10)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA13672 (52.9)64 (47.1)13583 (61.5)52 (38.5)
□ TUNCOM 78 9 (11.5) 69 (88.5) 108 9 (8.3) 99 (91.7)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM9693 (96.9)3 (3.1)102100 (98.0)2 (2.0)
▪ UNECOM 124 30 (24.2) 94 (60.3) 125 27 (21.6) 98 (78.4)
▪ VCOM15653 (34.0)103 (66.0)16070 (43.8)90 (56.3)
▪ WesternU/COMP 207 196 (94.7) 11 (5.3) 219 135 (61.6) 84 (38.4)
▪ WVSOM 108
54 (50.0)
54 (50.0)
111
50 (45.0)
61 (55.0)
Total 3646 1830 (50.2) 1816 (49.8) 3908 2090 (53.5) 1818 (46.5)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006).
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
Table 3
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: State Residency Status of First-Year Students by College *


2004-2005

2005-2006
COM
n
Residents
Nonresidents
n
Residents
Nonresidents
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 178 37 (20.8) 141 (79.2) 175 25 (14.3) 150 (85.7)
▪ DMU-COM23056 (24.4)174 (75.7)21959 (26.9)160 (73.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 239 36 (15.1) 203 (84.9) 251 200 (79.7) 51 (20.3)
▪ LECOM23076 (33.0)154 (66.0)23173 (31.6)158 (68.4)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 163 56 (34.4) 107 (65.6) 166 58 (34.9) 108 (65.1)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 148 132 (89.2) 16 (10.8) 205 185 (90.2) 20 (9.8)
▪ MWU/AZCOM14843 (29.1)105 (70.9)16639 (23.5)127 (76.5)
▪ MWU/CCOM 175 99 (56.6) 76 (43.4) 182 74 (40.7) 108 (59.3)
▪ NSU-COM22298 (44.1)124 (55.9)246129 (52.4)117 (47.6)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 315 204 (64.8) 111 (35.2) 321 230 (71.7) 91 (28.3)
▪ OSU-COM8978 (87.6)11 (12.4)9380 (86.0)13 (14.0)
▪ OU-COM 116 101 (87.1) 15 (12.9) 115 113 (98.3) 2 (1.7)
▪ PCOM274138 (50.4)136 (49.6)275164 (59.6)111 (40.4)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA NA 83 35 (42.2) 48 (57.8)
▪ PCSOM7937 (46.8)42 (53.2)8026 (32.5)54 (67.5)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM135132 (97.8)3 (2.2)140126 (90.0)14 (10)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA13672 (52.9)64 (47.1)13583 (61.5)52 (38.5)
□ TUNCOM 78 9 (11.5) 69 (88.5) 108 9 (8.3) 99 (91.7)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM9693 (96.9)3 (3.1)102100 (98.0)2 (2.0)
▪ UNECOM 124 30 (24.2) 94 (60.3) 125 27 (21.6) 98 (78.4)
▪ VCOM15653 (34.0)103 (66.0)16070 (43.8)90 (56.3)
▪ WesternU/COMP 207 196 (94.7) 11 (5.3) 219 135 (61.6) 84 (38.4)
▪ WVSOM 108
54 (50.0)
54 (50.0)
111
50 (45.0)
61 (55.0)
Total 3646 1830 (50.2) 1816 (49.8) 3908 2090 (53.5) 1818 (46.5)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006).
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
×
Many students benefit from government funding, which continues to play an important role in the fiscal health of osteopathic medical education. The US Armed Forces, through the US Armed Forces Health Professions Scholarship Program,14-16 also continues to be an important source of funds for osteopathic medical students and schools.4 Accessibility to such scholarship programs and financial aid allows osteopathic medical education to be within reach for many individuals who would otherwise be unable to attend medical school. 
First-Year Student Enrollment: Academic Year 2005-2006
First-year student enrollment at COMs continues to increase. The first-year student enrollment in the 2005-2006 academic year was 3908, an increase of 262 (7.2%) students since the previous academic year.2 The growing number of students enrolled during the past decade2,8,11-13,17,18 is consistent with the requests of COMs for class-size increases and the approvals of such requests by COCA. 
As with the number of COM applications received from racial and ethnic minority students, the percentage of these students enrolled in COMs also increased in the 2005-2006 academic year. Students whose self-identified race or ethnic origin was Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American [non-Hispanic], Hispanic/Latino, and Native American/Alaskan Native represented 24.4% of the total enrollment at COMs during the 2005-2006 academic year (Table 4). This ethnic minority enrollment represents a slight increase from the 23.7% [corrected from 23.9%] reported for the previous academic year.2 
Table 4
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Total Enrollment vs Racial or Ethnic Minority Enrollment of Students by COM and Academic Year *


2004-2005

2005-2006
COM
n
Racial Minority Students, No. (%)
n
Racial Minority Students, No. (%)
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 649 96 (14.8) 670 111 (16.6)
▪ DMU-COM80880 (9.9)81786 (10.5)
▪ KCUMB-COM 926 146 (15.8) 940 99 (10.5)
▪ LECOM863148 (17.2)885164 (18.5)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 163 54 (33.1) 323 99 (30.7)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 538 85 (15.8) 616 100 (16.2)
▪ MWU/AZCOM55773 (13.1)57488 (15.3)
▪ MWU/CCOM 676 156 (23.1) 690 167 (24.2)
▪ NSU-COM802263 (32.8)822259 (31.5)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 1151 487 (42.3) 1176 513 (43.6)
▪ OSU-COM34871 (20.4)35278 (22.2)
▪ OU-COM 427 100 (23.4) 431 105 (24.4)
▪ PCOM1125210 (18.7)1041214 (20.6)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA 83 28 (33.7)
▪ PCSOM26523 (8.7)27829 (10.4)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM501176 (35.1)520190 (36.5)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA508132 (26.0)533161 (30.2)
□ TUNCOM 78 23 (29.5) 184 39 (21.2)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM365181 (49.6)384201 (52.3)
▪ UNECOM 491 51 (10.4) 499 50 (10.0)
▪ VCOM30766 (21.5)467107 (22.9)
▪ WesternU/COMP 710 332 (46.8) 724 341 (47.1)
▪ WVSOM 367
39 (10.6)
397
44 (11.1)
Total 12,625 2992 (23.7) 13,406 3273 (24.4)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Data for the 2004-2005 academic year have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Minority racial/ethnic groups are comprised of students who self-identified as belonging to any of the following races: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native. Students who self-identified as white (non-Hispanic) or other, and those who chose not to disclose this demographic data are not included in this total. Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine and American Osteopathic Association data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard. Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
Table 4
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Total Enrollment vs Racial or Ethnic Minority Enrollment of Students by COM and Academic Year *


2004-2005

2005-2006
COM
n
Racial Minority Students, No. (%)
n
Racial Minority Students, No. (%)
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 649 96 (14.8) 670 111 (16.6)
▪ DMU-COM80880 (9.9)81786 (10.5)
▪ KCUMB-COM 926 146 (15.8) 940 99 (10.5)
▪ LECOM863148 (17.2)885164 (18.5)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 163 54 (33.1) 323 99 (30.7)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 538 85 (15.8) 616 100 (16.2)
▪ MWU/AZCOM55773 (13.1)57488 (15.3)
▪ MWU/CCOM 676 156 (23.1) 690 167 (24.2)
▪ NSU-COM802263 (32.8)822259 (31.5)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 1151 487 (42.3) 1176 513 (43.6)
▪ OSU-COM34871 (20.4)35278 (22.2)
▪ OU-COM 427 100 (23.4) 431 105 (24.4)
▪ PCOM1125210 (18.7)1041214 (20.6)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA 83 28 (33.7)
▪ PCSOM26523 (8.7)27829 (10.4)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM501176 (35.1)520190 (36.5)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA508132 (26.0)533161 (30.2)
□ TUNCOM 78 23 (29.5) 184 39 (21.2)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM365181 (49.6)384201 (52.3)
▪ UNECOM 491 51 (10.4) 499 50 (10.0)
▪ VCOM30766 (21.5)467107 (22.9)
▪ WesternU/COMP 710 332 (46.8) 724 341 (47.1)
▪ WVSOM 367
39 (10.6)
397
44 (11.1)
Total 12,625 2992 (23.7) 13,406 3273 (24.4)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Data for the 2004-2005 academic year have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Minority racial/ethnic groups are comprised of students who self-identified as belonging to any of the following races: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native. Students who self-identified as white (non-Hispanic) or other, and those who chose not to disclose this demographic data are not included in this total. Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine and American Osteopathic Association data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard. Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
×
The number and percentage of women enrolled at COMs continues to increase. In the 2005-2006 academic year, nearly 50% of all enrolled students were women (Table 5). 
Table 5
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Student Enrollment by Sex, 1995-2005

Year of Matriculation


Students, No. (%)*
n
Men
Women
199584755400 (63.7)3075 (36.3)
1996 8961 5653 (63.1) 3308 (36.9)
199794345843 (61.9)3591 (38.1)
1998 9882 6020 (60.9) 3862 (39.1)
199910,3886207 (59.8)4181 (40.2)
2000 10,817 6374 (58.9) 4443 (41.1)
200111,1036322 (56.9)4781 (43.1)
2002 11,198 6099 (54.5) 5099 (44.5)
2003§11,8576300 (53.1)5557 (46.9)
2004 12,525 6410 (51.2) 6115 (48.8)
200513,4066751 (50.4)6655 (49.6)
 Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Data for academic years from 1995 through 2004 have been reported previously in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.2,8,17
 *Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Data for 1996 include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians students at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury as well as the first matriculating class at Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine in Glendale (n=103: men, 70; women, 33).
 Data for 1997 include the first matriculating class at Pikeville (Ky) College School of Osteopathic Medicine (n=60: men, 46; women, 14) and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine-California in Vallejo (n=66: men, 40; women, 26).
 §Data for 2003 include the first matriculating class at Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg (n=154: men, 80; women, 74).
Table 5
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Student Enrollment by Sex, 1995-2005

Year of Matriculation


Students, No. (%)*
n
Men
Women
199584755400 (63.7)3075 (36.3)
1996 8961 5653 (63.1) 3308 (36.9)
199794345843 (61.9)3591 (38.1)
1998 9882 6020 (60.9) 3862 (39.1)
199910,3886207 (59.8)4181 (40.2)
2000 10,817 6374 (58.9) 4443 (41.1)
200111,1036322 (56.9)4781 (43.1)
2002 11,198 6099 (54.5) 5099 (44.5)
2003§11,8576300 (53.1)5557 (46.9)
2004 12,525 6410 (51.2) 6115 (48.8)
200513,4066751 (50.4)6655 (49.6)
 Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Data for academic years from 1995 through 2004 have been reported previously in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.2,8,17
 *Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Data for 1996 include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians students at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury as well as the first matriculating class at Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine in Glendale (n=103: men, 70; women, 33).
 Data for 1997 include the first matriculating class at Pikeville (Ky) College School of Osteopathic Medicine (n=60: men, 46; women, 14) and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine-California in Vallejo (n=66: men, 40; women, 26).
 §Data for 2003 include the first matriculating class at Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg (n=154: men, 80; women, 74).
×
First-year osteopathic medical students entering COMs in the 2005-2006 academic year had a mean grade point average of 3.44, representing virtually no change when compared with the 3.42 mean grade point average of students matriculating in the 2004-2005 academic year.2 Mean scores of Medical College Admission Tests (MCAT) for these first-year students were as follows: biological sciences, 8.64; physical sciences, 8.04; and verbal reasoning, 8.31. The mean MCAT scores of osteopathic medical students entering the 2005-2006 academic year were higher than the scores of student in the preceding class: biological sciences, 8.53; physical sciences, 7.89; and verbal reasoning, 8.24.2 
COM Graduates: Class of 2006
During the past 5 years, there has been an increase in the number of COM graduates of approximately 12% from the 2001-2002 academic year to the 2005-2006 academic year. Such an increase is expected in light of the growth in the number of applicants and enrolled first-year students, in addition to the growth in COM requests for class-size increases. There has been a 3% average annual increase in the number of COM graduates each academic year (Table 6). 
Table 6
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Number of Graduates by Academic Year and College, 2001-2006 *


Academic Year
COM
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 146 (5.8) 166 (6.4) 140 (5.2) 150 (5.4) 171 (6.0)
▪ DMU-COM187 (7.4)196 (7.5)190 (7.0)190 (6.9)202 (7.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 215 (8.5) 204 (7.8) 203 (7.5) 231 (8.4) 230 (8.1)
▪ LECOM127 (5.0)134 (5.1)170 (6.3)180 (6.5)216 (7.6)
□ LECOM-Bradenton NA NA NA NA NA
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 119 (4.7) 126 (4.8) 129 (4.8) 124 (4.5) 112 (4.0)
▪ MWU/AZCOM118 (4.7)122 (4.7)126 (4.6)130 (4.7)140 (4.9)
▪ MWU/CCOM 160 (6.3) 155 (5.9) 160 (5.9) 153 (5.6) 164 (5.8)
▪ NSU-COM157 (6.2)177 (6.8)165 (6.1)189 (6.9)163 (5.8)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 237 (9.3) 257 (9.9) 294 (10.9) 261 (9.5) 250 (8.8)
▪ OSU-COM83 (3.3)81 (3.1)84 (3.1)83 (3.0)92 (3.3)
▪ OU-COM 94 (3.7) 104 (4.0) 100 (3.7) 98 (3.5) 103 (3.6)
▪ PCOM248 (9.8)233 (8.9)238 (8.8)245 (8.9)248 (8.8)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ PCSOM62 (2.4)53 (2.0)59 (2.2)54 (2.0)56 (2.0)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM108 (4.3)109 (4.2)117 (4.3)115 (4.2)115 (4.1)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA64 (2.5)83 (3.2)107 (3.9)117 (4.2)128 (4.5)
□ TUNCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ UMDNJ-SOM80 (3.2)70 (2.7)77 (2.8)82 (3.0)107 (3.8)
▪ UNECOM 109 (4.3) 98 (3.8) 108 (4.0) 105 (3.8) 91 (3.2)
▪ VCOMNANANANANA
▪ WesternU/COMP 164 (6.5) 161 (6.2) 174 (6.4) 180 (6.5) 153 (5.4)
▪ WVSOM 58 (2.3)
78 (3.0)
72 (2.7)
69 (2.5)
88 (3.1)
Total 2536 2607 2713 2756 2829
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006).
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
Table 6
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Number of Graduates by Academic Year and College, 2001-2006 *


Academic Year
COM
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 146 (5.8) 166 (6.4) 140 (5.2) 150 (5.4) 171 (6.0)
▪ DMU-COM187 (7.4)196 (7.5)190 (7.0)190 (6.9)202 (7.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 215 (8.5) 204 (7.8) 203 (7.5) 231 (8.4) 230 (8.1)
▪ LECOM127 (5.0)134 (5.1)170 (6.3)180 (6.5)216 (7.6)
□ LECOM-Bradenton NA NA NA NA NA
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 119 (4.7) 126 (4.8) 129 (4.8) 124 (4.5) 112 (4.0)
▪ MWU/AZCOM118 (4.7)122 (4.7)126 (4.6)130 (4.7)140 (4.9)
▪ MWU/CCOM 160 (6.3) 155 (5.9) 160 (5.9) 153 (5.6) 164 (5.8)
▪ NSU-COM157 (6.2)177 (6.8)165 (6.1)189 (6.9)163 (5.8)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 237 (9.3) 257 (9.9) 294 (10.9) 261 (9.5) 250 (8.8)
▪ OSU-COM83 (3.3)81 (3.1)84 (3.1)83 (3.0)92 (3.3)
▪ OU-COM 94 (3.7) 104 (4.0) 100 (3.7) 98 (3.5) 103 (3.6)
▪ PCOM248 (9.8)233 (8.9)238 (8.8)245 (8.9)248 (8.8)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ PCSOM62 (2.4)53 (2.0)59 (2.2)54 (2.0)56 (2.0)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM108 (4.3)109 (4.2)117 (4.3)115 (4.2)115 (4.1)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA64 (2.5)83 (3.2)107 (3.9)117 (4.2)128 (4.5)
□ TUNCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ UMDNJ-SOM80 (3.2)70 (2.7)77 (2.8)82 (3.0)107 (3.8)
▪ UNECOM 109 (4.3) 98 (3.8) 108 (4.0) 105 (3.8) 91 (3.2)
▪ VCOMNANANANANA
▪ WesternU/COMP 164 (6.5) 161 (6.2) 174 (6.4) 180 (6.5) 153 (5.4)
▪ WVSOM 58 (2.3)
78 (3.0)
72 (2.7)
69 (2.5)
88 (3.1)
Total 2536 2607 2713 2756 2829
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006).
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
×
Revenues and Expenditures at COMs
For fiscal year 2005, the 20 COMs reported revenues totaling approximately $899 million, which constitutes a 5.5% increase from reported revenues of $852 million in 2004.2 As in the past years,2 tuition contributes substantially more to total revenues in private schools than it does in public schools, which draw more heavily from state subsidies. 
Total expenditures reported by COMs for fiscal year 2005 were approximately $795 million, an increase of 4.2% from the $759 million reported for fiscal year 2004.2 Instruction continues to account for the largest portion of these expenditures, though this total does not include basic expenses paid by the home institution (eg, libraries, facilities, utilities) for which the COMs are responsible and must repay.2 In other words, the expenditures cited do not capture all institutional support expenses for those COMs that are housed within another degree-granting institution. 
Conclusion
Since 2002, the number of applications received by COMs have increased, as have enrollment numbers—driven somewhat by applications from women. In fact, women now represent a little more than half of all COM applicants. However, the cost of medical education is on the rise. This increased cost may affect the number of applications COMs see in the future unless students are provided with adequate opportunities to lessen the heavy debt burden often associated with medical education (eg, scholarship funding).19 
Although a causal relationship has not been established, it is clear that the increased interest in developing new COMs since 2000 has occurred in a time of increasing applications. The COMs will need to exercise continued diligence in their recruiting efforts if they wish to maintain high admission standards and further expand student diversity. The Commission will continue to exercise care in the scrutiny of new COM applications—as well as in COM recruitment plans and clerkship training opportunities—to ensure the success of future COM graduates. Finally, COCA will need to review all substantive changes in COM class-size requests to make sure that the quality of undergraduate osteopathic medical education is not compromised. 
Council on Graduate Medical Education. Physician Workforce Policy Guidelines for the United States, 2000-2020. US Department of Health and Human Services: Rockville, Md; 2005. Available at: http://www.cogme.gov/report16.htm. Accessed March 23, 2007.
Griffin AVO, Sweet S. Undergraduate osteopathic medical education: addressing the impact of college growth on the applicant pool and student enrollment. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2006;106:51-56. Available at: http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/content/full/106/2/51. Accessed March 21, 2007.
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association. AACOM/AOA Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: Academic Year 2005-06. American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine: Chevy Chase, Md;2005 .
American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. Tuition Survey. Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education, 2006. Available at: http://www.aacom.org/data/annualreport/slideshow/index.html. Accessed April 5, 2007.
“The work ahead,” AAMC president's address 2005 [press release]. Washington, DC: Association of American Medical Colleges; November 6, 2005. Available at: http://www.aamc.org/newsroom/pressrel/2005/051106.htm. Accessed January 31, 2007.
Rosenthal MB, Zaslavsky A, Newhouse JP. The geographic distribution of physicians revisited. Health Serv Res. 2005;40:1931-1952.
Excess, shortage, or sufficient physician workforce: how could we know? Am Fam Physician. 2005;72:1670 .
Singer A. Undergraduate osteopathic medical education. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2001;101:646-652. Available at: http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/reprint/101/11/646. Accessed April 6, 2007.
New medical school breaks ground in Colorado: Rocky Vista University College of Osteopathic Medicine to expand access to quality healthcare to rural and underserved populations in state [press release]. London, United Kingdom: PR Newswire – United Business Media; March 23, 2007. Available at: http://sev.prnewswire.com/education/20070323/DCF01323032007-1.html#. Accessed April 12, 2007.
Welcome to Georgia Campus - PCOM page. Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine Web site. Available at: http://www.pcom.edu/General_Information/georgia/georgia.html. Accessed April 16, 2007.
Sweet S. Undergraduate osteopathic medical education [published correction appears in J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2003;103:215]. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2002;102:576-581. Available at: http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/reprint/102/11/576. Accessed April 10, 2007.
Sweet S. Undergraduate osteopathic medical education [published correction appears in J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2004;104:71]. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2003;103:507-512. Available at: http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/reprint/103/11/507. Accessed April 10, 2007.
Sweet S. Undergraduate osteopathic medical education [published correction appears in J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2006;106:46]. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2004;104:460-467. Available at: http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/content/full/104/11/460. Accessed March 23, 2007.
Healthcare education: money for school page. US Airforce Web site. Available at: http://www.airforce.com/education/healthcare/money-ForSchool.php. Accessed April 12, 2007.
US Army. Health Professions Scholarship Program [fact sheet]. August 2006. Available at: http://www.goarmy.com/amedd/docs/hpsp.pdf. Accessed April 12, 2007.
Careers & Jobs – Officers – Healthcare – Physicians page. Navy Web site. Available at: http://www.navy.com/careers/officer/healthcare/physicians/. Accessed April 12, 2007.
Rayman C. Undergraduate osteopathic medical education. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 1996;96:655-660.
Sweet S. Undergraduate osteopathic medical education. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2000;100:671-674,677-679. Available at: http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/reprint/100/11/671. Accessed March 30, 2007.
Weinberg AM. Lessons in financial health and debt management for young physicians: loan consolidation programs, loan deferments, and tax savings. J Am Osteopath Assoc. 2002;102:545-548,551-554. Available at: http://www.jaoa.org/cgi/reprint/102/10/545. Accessed March 22, 2007.
Table 1
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Applications Received, First-Year Enrollment, and Total Enrollment by College *




Enrollment
Total Applications Received
First Year
Total
COM
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 2463 2621 178 (4.9) 175 (4.5) 649 (5.2) 670 (5.0)
▪ DMU-COM22792368230 (6.3)219 (5.6)808 (6.5)817 (6.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 2216 2228 239 (6.6) 251 (6.4) 926 (7.4) 940 (7.0)
▪ LECOM25602497230 (6.3)231 (5.9)863 (6.9)885 (6.6)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 2560 1746 163 (4.5) 166 (4.2) 163 (1.3) 323 (2.4)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 1685 1923 148 (4.1) 205 (5.2) 538 (4.3) 616 (4.6)
▪ MWU/AZCOM21252359148 (4.1)166 (4.2)557 (4.4)574 (4.3)
▪ MWU/CCOM 2943 3197 175 (4.8) 182 (4.7) 676 (5.4) 690 (5.1)
▪ NSU-COM22022542222 (6.1)246 (6.3)802 (6.4)822 (6.1)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 2962 3285 315 (8.6) 321 (8.2) 1151 (9.2) 1176 (8.8)
▪ OSU-COM1180123889 (2.4)93 (2.4)348 (2.8)352 (2.6)
▪ OU-COM 2125 2338 116 (3.2) 115 (2.9) 427 (3.4) 431 (3.2)
▪ PCOM35393825274 (7.5)275 (7.0)1025 (8.2)1041 (7.8)
□ GA-PCOM NA 1682 NA 83 (2.1) NA 83 (0.6)
▪ PCSOM1340147679 (2.2)80 (2.0)265 (2.1)278 (2.1)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM14831701135 (3.7)140 (3.6)501 (4.0)520 (3.9)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA21562091136 (3.7)135 (3.5)508 (4.1)533 (4.0)
□ TUNCOM 2156 1509 78 (2.1) 108 (2.8) 78 (0.6) 184 (1.4)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM1984240196 (2.6)102 (2.6)365 (2.9)384 (2.9)
▪ UNECOM 1879 2443 124 (3.4) 125 (3.2) 491 (3.9) 499 (3.7)
▪ VCOM13791673156 (4.3)160 (4.1)307 (2.5)467 (3.5)
▪ WesternU/COMP 2033 2321 207 (5.7) 219 (5.6) 710 (5.7) 724 (5.4)
▪ WVSOM 1500
1635
108 (3.0)
111 (2.8)
367 (2.9)
397 (3.0)
Total 46,749 51,099 3646 3908 12,525 13,406
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of the JAOA.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Most data shown for the 2004-2005 academic year have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding. Because most applicants apply to several COMs, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of individual applicants shown in Table 2. As noted below, the data reported are received from the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS). That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education.4 Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data are current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to AACOMAS data. Changes made to previously reported data for the 2004-2005 academic year follow.2 Data for Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton (Fla) and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson were not available at publication for the February 2006 issue of the JAOA and have been included here. Previously reported data for Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine—California in Vallejo have been updated from 2157 to 2156, and the total number of applications received has been corrected accordingly from 46,750 to 46,749. The number of students enrolled at Philadelphia (Pa) College of Osteopathic Medicine has been corrected from the 1125 previously reported2 to 1025. The total number of students enrolled at the nation's COMs during the 2004-2005 academic year remains unchanged at 12,525.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Application and enrollment data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004. Each of these branch campuses shares the applicant pool with its parent institution. As noted in the first footnote above, data for the 2004-2005 academic year were not reported in the JAOA previously.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
Table 1
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Applications Received, First-Year Enrollment, and Total Enrollment by College *




Enrollment
Total Applications Received
First Year
Total
COM
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
2004-2005
2005-2006
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 2463 2621 178 (4.9) 175 (4.5) 649 (5.2) 670 (5.0)
▪ DMU-COM22792368230 (6.3)219 (5.6)808 (6.5)817 (6.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 2216 2228 239 (6.6) 251 (6.4) 926 (7.4) 940 (7.0)
▪ LECOM25602497230 (6.3)231 (5.9)863 (6.9)885 (6.6)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 2560 1746 163 (4.5) 166 (4.2) 163 (1.3) 323 (2.4)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 1685 1923 148 (4.1) 205 (5.2) 538 (4.3) 616 (4.6)
▪ MWU/AZCOM21252359148 (4.1)166 (4.2)557 (4.4)574 (4.3)
▪ MWU/CCOM 2943 3197 175 (4.8) 182 (4.7) 676 (5.4) 690 (5.1)
▪ NSU-COM22022542222 (6.1)246 (6.3)802 (6.4)822 (6.1)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 2962 3285 315 (8.6) 321 (8.2) 1151 (9.2) 1176 (8.8)
▪ OSU-COM1180123889 (2.4)93 (2.4)348 (2.8)352 (2.6)
▪ OU-COM 2125 2338 116 (3.2) 115 (2.9) 427 (3.4) 431 (3.2)
▪ PCOM35393825274 (7.5)275 (7.0)1025 (8.2)1041 (7.8)
□ GA-PCOM NA 1682 NA 83 (2.1) NA 83 (0.6)
▪ PCSOM1340147679 (2.2)80 (2.0)265 (2.1)278 (2.1)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM14831701135 (3.7)140 (3.6)501 (4.0)520 (3.9)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA21562091136 (3.7)135 (3.5)508 (4.1)533 (4.0)
□ TUNCOM 2156 1509 78 (2.1) 108 (2.8) 78 (0.6) 184 (1.4)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM1984240196 (2.6)102 (2.6)365 (2.9)384 (2.9)
▪ UNECOM 1879 2443 124 (3.4) 125 (3.2) 491 (3.9) 499 (3.7)
▪ VCOM13791673156 (4.3)160 (4.1)307 (2.5)467 (3.5)
▪ WesternU/COMP 2033 2321 207 (5.7) 219 (5.6) 710 (5.7) 724 (5.4)
▪ WVSOM 1500
1635
108 (3.0)
111 (2.8)
367 (2.9)
397 (3.0)
Total 46,749 51,099 3646 3908 12,525 13,406
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of the JAOA.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Most data shown for the 2004-2005 academic year have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding. Because most applicants apply to several COMs, the number of applications shown in this table is significantly higher than the number of individual applicants shown in Table 2. As noted below, the data reported are received from the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS). That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education.4 Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data are current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to AACOMAS data. Changes made to previously reported data for the 2004-2005 academic year follow.2 Data for Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton (Fla) and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson were not available at publication for the February 2006 issue of the JAOA and have been included here. Previously reported data for Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine—California in Vallejo have been updated from 2157 to 2156, and the total number of applications received has been corrected accordingly from 46,750 to 46,749. The number of students enrolled at Philadelphia (Pa) College of Osteopathic Medicine has been corrected from the 1125 previously reported2 to 1025. The total number of students enrolled at the nation's COMs during the 2004-2005 academic year remains unchanged at 12,525.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Application and enrollment data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004. Each of these branch campuses shares the applicant pool with its parent institution. As noted in the first footnote above, data for the 2004-2005 academic year were not reported in the JAOA previously.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
×
Table 2
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Applicants' Self-Designated Race or Ethnic Origin, 2001-2006 *

Race

2001 (n=6898)

2002 (n=6324)

2003 (n=6814)

2004 (n=7240)

2005 (n=8258)

2006 (n=9476)
Asian/Pacific Islander1226 (17.8)1086 (17.2)1201 (17.6)1357 (18.7)1669 (20.2)1936 (20.4)
White (non-Hispanic) 4731 (68.6) 4285 (67.8) 4567 (67.0) 4725 (65.3) 5230 (63.3) 5924 (62.5)
Underrepresented Minorities§693 (10.0)684 (10.8)732 (10.7)817 (11.3)971 (11.8)1117 (11.8)
□ Black/African American (non-Hispanic) 335 (4.9) 342 (5.4) 358 (5.3) 404 (5.6) 492 (6.0) 620 (6.5)
□ Hispanic/Latino290 (4.2)287 (4.5)314 (4.6)350 (4.8)420 (5.1)434 (4.6)
□ Native American/Alaskan Native 68 (1.0) 55 (0.9) 60 (0.9) 63 (0.9) 59 (0.7) 63 (0.7)
Other or Unknown248 (3.6)269 (4.3)314 (4.6)341 (4.7)388 (4.7)499 (5.3)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of the JAOA.Sources: Data are current as of April 2007 and were provided by AACOM. Data for academic years from 2001 through 2005 have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding. Totals reported here do not include applicants who applied directly to the COMs. Nineteen COMs have participated in the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS) for all years except 2001, 2002, and 2003, during which 18 colleges participated. Since 2000 (ie, for the 2001-2002 academic year), applications submitted to the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center at Fort Worth/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM) have been processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service rather than AACOMAS, so data from that COM are not included in this table. As noted below, the data reported are received from AACOM's AACOMAS. That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education.4 Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data are current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to AACOMAS data. Changes made to previously reported data for 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2005 follow.2 For 2001, the total number of applications was reported2 as 7259, but has been corrected to 6898. In addition, though the number of applications reported by race/ethnicity remains unchanged, the percentages reported have been corrected as shown above. These percentages were reported as follows: Asian/Pacific Islander, 16.9; white (non-Hispanic), 65.2; black/African American (non-Hispanic), 4.6; Hispanic/Latino, 4.0; Native American/Alaskan Native, 0.9; and other or unknown, 3.4. For 2002, though the total number of applications reported for applicants who self-identified as Other or did not provide race/ethnicity data remains unchanged at 269, the percentage has been corrected to 4.3 from 4.2. For 2003, the total number of applications was reported2 as 6813, but has been corrected to 6814. In addition, though the number reported for Asian/Pacific Islander remains unchanged at 1201, the percentage reported has been corrected to 17.6 from 7.6. Finally, most data previously reported2 for 2005 has been corrected: (1) The total number of applications was originally reported as 8255, but has been corrected to 8258. (2) Asian/Pacific Islander was reported as 1668 and has been corrected to 1669, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (3) White (non-Hispanic) was reported as 5229 and has been corrected to 5930, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (4) Underrepresented minorities was reported as 969 (11.7) and has been corrected to 971 (11.8). (5) Black/African American (non-Hispanic) was reported as 491 (5.9) and has been corrected to 492 (6.0). (6) Hispanic/Latino was reported as 419 and has been corrected to 420, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (7) Other or Unknown was reported as 389 and has been corrected to 388, but the percentage reported remains unchanged.
 In 2003, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg, began participating in AACOMAS when it admitted its first matriculating class.
 Data reported for 2001 includes 177 applicants who applied only to TCOM, which has not participated in AACOMAS since 2000, as noted above.
 §Underrepresented minority racial/ethnic groups are comprised of students who self-identified as belonging to any of the following races: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native. Students who self-identified as white (non-Hispanic) or other, and those who chose not to disclose this demographic data are not included in this total. Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, AACOM and AOA data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard.
Table 2
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Applicants' Self-Designated Race or Ethnic Origin, 2001-2006 *

Race

2001 (n=6898)

2002 (n=6324)

2003 (n=6814)

2004 (n=7240)

2005 (n=8258)

2006 (n=9476)
Asian/Pacific Islander1226 (17.8)1086 (17.2)1201 (17.6)1357 (18.7)1669 (20.2)1936 (20.4)
White (non-Hispanic) 4731 (68.6) 4285 (67.8) 4567 (67.0) 4725 (65.3) 5230 (63.3) 5924 (62.5)
Underrepresented Minorities§693 (10.0)684 (10.8)732 (10.7)817 (11.3)971 (11.8)1117 (11.8)
□ Black/African American (non-Hispanic) 335 (4.9) 342 (5.4) 358 (5.3) 404 (5.6) 492 (6.0) 620 (6.5)
□ Hispanic/Latino290 (4.2)287 (4.5)314 (4.6)350 (4.8)420 (5.1)434 (4.6)
□ Native American/Alaskan Native 68 (1.0) 55 (0.9) 60 (0.9) 63 (0.9) 59 (0.7) 63 (0.7)
Other or Unknown248 (3.6)269 (4.3)314 (4.6)341 (4.7)388 (4.7)499 (5.3)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of the JAOA.Sources: Data are current as of April 2007 and were provided by AACOM. Data for academic years from 2001 through 2005 have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding. Totals reported here do not include applicants who applied directly to the COMs. Nineteen COMs have participated in the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Application Service (AACOMAS) for all years except 2001, 2002, and 2003, during which 18 colleges participated. Since 2000 (ie, for the 2001-2002 academic year), applications submitted to the University of North Texas Health Sciences Center at Fort Worth/Texas College of Osteopathic Medicine (TCOM) have been processed through the Texas Statewide Application Service rather than AACOMAS, so data from that COM are not included in this table. As noted below, the data reported are received from AACOM's AACOMAS. That association researches and updates its data regularly, providing corrected numbers on an annual basis in the AACOM Annual Statistical Report on Osteopathic Medical Education.4 Therefore, the data as reported in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association are to be considered incomplete, though this data will be corrected annually as AACOM makes its data available. All data are current as of publication. Readers are encouraged to contact AACOM directly for any subsequent updates to AACOMAS data. Changes made to previously reported data for 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2005 follow.2 For 2001, the total number of applications was reported2 as 7259, but has been corrected to 6898. In addition, though the number of applications reported by race/ethnicity remains unchanged, the percentages reported have been corrected as shown above. These percentages were reported as follows: Asian/Pacific Islander, 16.9; white (non-Hispanic), 65.2; black/African American (non-Hispanic), 4.6; Hispanic/Latino, 4.0; Native American/Alaskan Native, 0.9; and other or unknown, 3.4. For 2002, though the total number of applications reported for applicants who self-identified as Other or did not provide race/ethnicity data remains unchanged at 269, the percentage has been corrected to 4.3 from 4.2. For 2003, the total number of applications was reported2 as 6813, but has been corrected to 6814. In addition, though the number reported for Asian/Pacific Islander remains unchanged at 1201, the percentage reported has been corrected to 17.6 from 7.6. Finally, most data previously reported2 for 2005 has been corrected: (1) The total number of applications was originally reported as 8255, but has been corrected to 8258. (2) Asian/Pacific Islander was reported as 1668 and has been corrected to 1669, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (3) White (non-Hispanic) was reported as 5229 and has been corrected to 5930, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (4) Underrepresented minorities was reported as 969 (11.7) and has been corrected to 971 (11.8). (5) Black/African American (non-Hispanic) was reported as 491 (5.9) and has been corrected to 492 (6.0). (6) Hispanic/Latino was reported as 419 and has been corrected to 420, but the percentage reported remains unchanged. (7) Other or Unknown was reported as 389 and has been corrected to 388, but the percentage reported remains unchanged.
 In 2003, Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg, began participating in AACOMAS when it admitted its first matriculating class.
 Data reported for 2001 includes 177 applicants who applied only to TCOM, which has not participated in AACOMAS since 2000, as noted above.
 §Underrepresented minority racial/ethnic groups are comprised of students who self-identified as belonging to any of the following races: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native. Students who self-identified as white (non-Hispanic) or other, and those who chose not to disclose this demographic data are not included in this total. Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, AACOM and AOA data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard.
×
Table 3
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: State Residency Status of First-Year Students by College *


2004-2005

2005-2006
COM
n
Residents
Nonresidents
n
Residents
Nonresidents
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 178 37 (20.8) 141 (79.2) 175 25 (14.3) 150 (85.7)
▪ DMU-COM23056 (24.4)174 (75.7)21959 (26.9)160 (73.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 239 36 (15.1) 203 (84.9) 251 200 (79.7) 51 (20.3)
▪ LECOM23076 (33.0)154 (66.0)23173 (31.6)158 (68.4)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 163 56 (34.4) 107 (65.6) 166 58 (34.9) 108 (65.1)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 148 132 (89.2) 16 (10.8) 205 185 (90.2) 20 (9.8)
▪ MWU/AZCOM14843 (29.1)105 (70.9)16639 (23.5)127 (76.5)
▪ MWU/CCOM 175 99 (56.6) 76 (43.4) 182 74 (40.7) 108 (59.3)
▪ NSU-COM22298 (44.1)124 (55.9)246129 (52.4)117 (47.6)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 315 204 (64.8) 111 (35.2) 321 230 (71.7) 91 (28.3)
▪ OSU-COM8978 (87.6)11 (12.4)9380 (86.0)13 (14.0)
▪ OU-COM 116 101 (87.1) 15 (12.9) 115 113 (98.3) 2 (1.7)
▪ PCOM274138 (50.4)136 (49.6)275164 (59.6)111 (40.4)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA NA 83 35 (42.2) 48 (57.8)
▪ PCSOM7937 (46.8)42 (53.2)8026 (32.5)54 (67.5)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM135132 (97.8)3 (2.2)140126 (90.0)14 (10)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA13672 (52.9)64 (47.1)13583 (61.5)52 (38.5)
□ TUNCOM 78 9 (11.5) 69 (88.5) 108 9 (8.3) 99 (91.7)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM9693 (96.9)3 (3.1)102100 (98.0)2 (2.0)
▪ UNECOM 124 30 (24.2) 94 (60.3) 125 27 (21.6) 98 (78.4)
▪ VCOM15653 (34.0)103 (66.0)16070 (43.8)90 (56.3)
▪ WesternU/COMP 207 196 (94.7) 11 (5.3) 219 135 (61.6) 84 (38.4)
▪ WVSOM 108
54 (50.0)
54 (50.0)
111
50 (45.0)
61 (55.0)
Total 3646 1830 (50.2) 1816 (49.8) 3908 2090 (53.5) 1818 (46.5)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006).
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
Table 3
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: State Residency Status of First-Year Students by College *


2004-2005

2005-2006
COM
n
Residents
Nonresidents
n
Residents
Nonresidents
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 178 37 (20.8) 141 (79.2) 175 25 (14.3) 150 (85.7)
▪ DMU-COM23056 (24.4)174 (75.7)21959 (26.9)160 (73.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 239 36 (15.1) 203 (84.9) 251 200 (79.7) 51 (20.3)
▪ LECOM23076 (33.0)154 (66.0)23173 (31.6)158 (68.4)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 163 56 (34.4) 107 (65.6) 166 58 (34.9) 108 (65.1)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 148 132 (89.2) 16 (10.8) 205 185 (90.2) 20 (9.8)
▪ MWU/AZCOM14843 (29.1)105 (70.9)16639 (23.5)127 (76.5)
▪ MWU/CCOM 175 99 (56.6) 76 (43.4) 182 74 (40.7) 108 (59.3)
▪ NSU-COM22298 (44.1)124 (55.9)246129 (52.4)117 (47.6)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 315 204 (64.8) 111 (35.2) 321 230 (71.7) 91 (28.3)
▪ OSU-COM8978 (87.6)11 (12.4)9380 (86.0)13 (14.0)
▪ OU-COM 116 101 (87.1) 15 (12.9) 115 113 (98.3) 2 (1.7)
▪ PCOM274138 (50.4)136 (49.6)275164 (59.6)111 (40.4)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA NA 83 35 (42.2) 48 (57.8)
▪ PCSOM7937 (46.8)42 (53.2)8026 (32.5)54 (67.5)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM135132 (97.8)3 (2.2)140126 (90.0)14 (10)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA13672 (52.9)64 (47.1)13583 (61.5)52 (38.5)
□ TUNCOM 78 9 (11.5) 69 (88.5) 108 9 (8.3) 99 (91.7)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM9693 (96.9)3 (3.1)102100 (98.0)2 (2.0)
▪ UNECOM 124 30 (24.2) 94 (60.3) 125 27 (21.6) 98 (78.4)
▪ VCOM15653 (34.0)103 (66.0)16070 (43.8)90 (56.3)
▪ WesternU/COMP 207 196 (94.7) 11 (5.3) 219 135 (61.6) 84 (38.4)
▪ WVSOM 108
54 (50.0)
54 (50.0)
111
50 (45.0)
61 (55.0)
Total 3646 1830 (50.2) 1816 (49.8) 3908 2090 (53.5) 1818 (46.5)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006).
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
×
Table 4
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Total Enrollment vs Racial or Ethnic Minority Enrollment of Students by COM and Academic Year *


2004-2005

2005-2006
COM
n
Racial Minority Students, No. (%)
n
Racial Minority Students, No. (%)
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 649 96 (14.8) 670 111 (16.6)
▪ DMU-COM80880 (9.9)81786 (10.5)
▪ KCUMB-COM 926 146 (15.8) 940 99 (10.5)
▪ LECOM863148 (17.2)885164 (18.5)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 163 54 (33.1) 323 99 (30.7)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 538 85 (15.8) 616 100 (16.2)
▪ MWU/AZCOM55773 (13.1)57488 (15.3)
▪ MWU/CCOM 676 156 (23.1) 690 167 (24.2)
▪ NSU-COM802263 (32.8)822259 (31.5)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 1151 487 (42.3) 1176 513 (43.6)
▪ OSU-COM34871 (20.4)35278 (22.2)
▪ OU-COM 427 100 (23.4) 431 105 (24.4)
▪ PCOM1125210 (18.7)1041214 (20.6)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA 83 28 (33.7)
▪ PCSOM26523 (8.7)27829 (10.4)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM501176 (35.1)520190 (36.5)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA508132 (26.0)533161 (30.2)
□ TUNCOM 78 23 (29.5) 184 39 (21.2)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM365181 (49.6)384201 (52.3)
▪ UNECOM 491 51 (10.4) 499 50 (10.0)
▪ VCOM30766 (21.5)467107 (22.9)
▪ WesternU/COMP 710 332 (46.8) 724 341 (47.1)
▪ WVSOM 367
39 (10.6)
397
44 (11.1)
Total 12,625 2992 (23.7) 13,406 3273 (24.4)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Data for the 2004-2005 academic year have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Minority racial/ethnic groups are comprised of students who self-identified as belonging to any of the following races: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native. Students who self-identified as white (non-Hispanic) or other, and those who chose not to disclose this demographic data are not included in this total. Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine and American Osteopathic Association data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard. Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
Table 4
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Total Enrollment vs Racial or Ethnic Minority Enrollment of Students by COM and Academic Year *


2004-2005

2005-2006
COM
n
Racial Minority Students, No. (%)
n
Racial Minority Students, No. (%)
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 649 96 (14.8) 670 111 (16.6)
▪ DMU-COM80880 (9.9)81786 (10.5)
▪ KCUMB-COM 926 146 (15.8) 940 99 (10.5)
▪ LECOM863148 (17.2)885164 (18.5)
□ LECOM-Bradenton 163 54 (33.1) 323 99 (30.7)
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 538 85 (15.8) 616 100 (16.2)
▪ MWU/AZCOM55773 (13.1)57488 (15.3)
▪ MWU/CCOM 676 156 (23.1) 690 167 (24.2)
▪ NSU-COM802263 (32.8)822259 (31.5)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 1151 487 (42.3) 1176 513 (43.6)
▪ OSU-COM34871 (20.4)35278 (22.2)
▪ OU-COM 427 100 (23.4) 431 105 (24.4)
▪ PCOM1125210 (18.7)1041214 (20.6)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA 83 28 (33.7)
▪ PCSOM26523 (8.7)27829 (10.4)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM501176 (35.1)520190 (36.5)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA508132 (26.0)533161 (30.2)
□ TUNCOM 78 23 (29.5) 184 39 (21.2)
▪ UMDNJ-SOM365181 (49.6)384201 (52.3)
▪ UNECOM 491 51 (10.4) 499 50 (10.0)
▪ VCOM30766 (21.5)467107 (22.9)
▪ WesternU/COMP 710 332 (46.8) 724 341 (47.1)
▪ WVSOM 367
39 (10.6)
397
44 (11.1)
Total 12,625 2992 (23.7) 13,406 3273 (24.4)
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Data for the 2004-2005 academic year have been reported previously in the JAOA.2
 *Minority racial/ethnic groups are comprised of students who self-identified as belonging to any of the following races: Asian/Pacific Islander, black/African American (non-Hispanic), Hispanic/Latino, or Native American/Alaskan Native. Students who self-identified as white (non-Hispanic) or other, and those who chose not to disclose this demographic data are not included in this total. Although US Census Bureau documents ask survey respondents about race and Hispanic ethnicity in two separate questions because a person of Hispanic ethnicity can be of any race, American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine and American Osteopathic Association data-collection methods have not yet conformed to this government standard. Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
×
Table 5
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Student Enrollment by Sex, 1995-2005

Year of Matriculation


Students, No. (%)*
n
Men
Women
199584755400 (63.7)3075 (36.3)
1996 8961 5653 (63.1) 3308 (36.9)
199794345843 (61.9)3591 (38.1)
1998 9882 6020 (60.9) 3862 (39.1)
199910,3886207 (59.8)4181 (40.2)
2000 10,817 6374 (58.9) 4443 (41.1)
200111,1036322 (56.9)4781 (43.1)
2002 11,198 6099 (54.5) 5099 (44.5)
2003§11,8576300 (53.1)5557 (46.9)
2004 12,525 6410 (51.2) 6115 (48.8)
200513,4066751 (50.4)6655 (49.6)
 Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Data for academic years from 1995 through 2004 have been reported previously in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.2,8,17
 *Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Data for 1996 include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians students at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury as well as the first matriculating class at Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine in Glendale (n=103: men, 70; women, 33).
 Data for 1997 include the first matriculating class at Pikeville (Ky) College School of Osteopathic Medicine (n=60: men, 46; women, 14) and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine-California in Vallejo (n=66: men, 40; women, 26).
 §Data for 2003 include the first matriculating class at Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg (n=154: men, 80; women, 74).
Table 5
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Student Enrollment by Sex, 1995-2005

Year of Matriculation


Students, No. (%)*
n
Men
Women
199584755400 (63.7)3075 (36.3)
1996 8961 5653 (63.1) 3308 (36.9)
199794345843 (61.9)3591 (38.1)
1998 9882 6020 (60.9) 3862 (39.1)
199910,3886207 (59.8)4181 (40.2)
2000 10,817 6374 (58.9) 4443 (41.1)
200111,1036322 (56.9)4781 (43.1)
2002 11,198 6099 (54.5) 5099 (44.5)
2003§11,8576300 (53.1)5557 (46.9)
2004 12,525 6410 (51.2) 6115 (48.8)
200513,4066751 (50.4)6655 (49.6)
 Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006). Data for academic years from 1995 through 2004 have been reported previously in JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.2,8,17
 *Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Data for 1996 include the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians students at New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury as well as the first matriculating class at Midwestern University/Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine in Glendale (n=103: men, 70; women, 33).
 Data for 1997 include the first matriculating class at Pikeville (Ky) College School of Osteopathic Medicine (n=60: men, 46; women, 14) and Touro University College of Osteopathic Medicine-California in Vallejo (n=66: men, 40; women, 26).
 §Data for 2003 include the first matriculating class at Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine in Blacksburg (n=154: men, 80; women, 74).
×
Table 6
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Number of Graduates by Academic Year and College, 2001-2006 *


Academic Year
COM
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 146 (5.8) 166 (6.4) 140 (5.2) 150 (5.4) 171 (6.0)
▪ DMU-COM187 (7.4)196 (7.5)190 (7.0)190 (6.9)202 (7.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 215 (8.5) 204 (7.8) 203 (7.5) 231 (8.4) 230 (8.1)
▪ LECOM127 (5.0)134 (5.1)170 (6.3)180 (6.5)216 (7.6)
□ LECOM-Bradenton NA NA NA NA NA
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 119 (4.7) 126 (4.8) 129 (4.8) 124 (4.5) 112 (4.0)
▪ MWU/AZCOM118 (4.7)122 (4.7)126 (4.6)130 (4.7)140 (4.9)
▪ MWU/CCOM 160 (6.3) 155 (5.9) 160 (5.9) 153 (5.6) 164 (5.8)
▪ NSU-COM157 (6.2)177 (6.8)165 (6.1)189 (6.9)163 (5.8)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 237 (9.3) 257 (9.9) 294 (10.9) 261 (9.5) 250 (8.8)
▪ OSU-COM83 (3.3)81 (3.1)84 (3.1)83 (3.0)92 (3.3)
▪ OU-COM 94 (3.7) 104 (4.0) 100 (3.7) 98 (3.5) 103 (3.6)
▪ PCOM248 (9.8)233 (8.9)238 (8.8)245 (8.9)248 (8.8)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ PCSOM62 (2.4)53 (2.0)59 (2.2)54 (2.0)56 (2.0)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM108 (4.3)109 (4.2)117 (4.3)115 (4.2)115 (4.1)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA64 (2.5)83 (3.2)107 (3.9)117 (4.2)128 (4.5)
□ TUNCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ UMDNJ-SOM80 (3.2)70 (2.7)77 (2.8)82 (3.0)107 (3.8)
▪ UNECOM 109 (4.3) 98 (3.8) 108 (4.0) 105 (3.8) 91 (3.2)
▪ VCOMNANANANANA
▪ WesternU/COMP 164 (6.5) 161 (6.2) 174 (6.4) 180 (6.5) 153 (5.4)
▪ WVSOM 58 (2.3)
78 (3.0)
72 (2.7)
69 (2.5)
88 (3.1)
Total 2536 2607 2713 2756 2829
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006).
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
Table 6
Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine in the United States: Number of Graduates by Academic Year and College, 2001-2006 *


Academic Year
COM
2001-2002
2002-2003
2003-2004
2004-2005
2005-2006
▪ ATSU COM-MesaNANANANANA
▪ ATSU-KCOM 146 (5.8) 166 (6.4) 140 (5.2) 150 (5.4) 171 (6.0)
▪ DMU-COM187 (7.4)196 (7.5)190 (7.0)190 (6.9)202 (7.1)
▪ KCUMB-COM 215 (8.5) 204 (7.8) 203 (7.5) 231 (8.4) 230 (8.1)
▪ LECOM127 (5.0)134 (5.1)170 (6.3)180 (6.5)216 (7.6)
□ LECOM-Bradenton NA NA NA NA NA
▪ LMU-DCOMNANANANANA
▪ MSUCOM 119 (4.7) 126 (4.8) 129 (4.8) 124 (4.5) 112 (4.0)
▪ MWU/AZCOM118 (4.7)122 (4.7)126 (4.6)130 (4.7)140 (4.9)
▪ MWU/CCOM 160 (6.3) 155 (5.9) 160 (5.9) 153 (5.6) 164 (5.8)
▪ NSU-COM157 (6.2)177 (6.8)165 (6.1)189 (6.9)163 (5.8)
▪ NYCOM/NYIT§ 237 (9.3) 257 (9.9) 294 (10.9) 261 (9.5) 250 (8.8)
▪ OSU-COM83 (3.3)81 (3.1)84 (3.1)83 (3.0)92 (3.3)
▪ OU-COM 94 (3.7) 104 (4.0) 100 (3.7) 98 (3.5) 103 (3.6)
▪ PCOM248 (9.8)233 (8.9)238 (8.8)245 (8.9)248 (8.8)
□ GA-PCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ PCSOM62 (2.4)53 (2.0)59 (2.2)54 (2.0)56 (2.0)
▪ RVUCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TCOM108 (4.3)109 (4.2)117 (4.3)115 (4.2)115 (4.1)
▪ TOUROCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ TUCOM-CA64 (2.5)83 (3.2)107 (3.9)117 (4.2)128 (4.5)
□ TUNCOM NA NA NA NA NA
▪ UMDNJ-SOM80 (3.2)70 (2.7)77 (2.8)82 (3.0)107 (3.8)
▪ UNECOM 109 (4.3) 98 (3.8) 108 (4.0) 105 (3.8) 91 (3.2)
▪ VCOMNANANANANA
▪ WesternU/COMP 164 (6.5) 161 (6.2) 174 (6.4) 180 (6.5) 153 (5.4)
▪ WVSOM 58 (2.3)
78 (3.0)
72 (2.7)
69 (2.5)
88 (3.1)
Total 2536 2607 2713 2756 2829
 Abbreviations: COM, colleges of osteopathic medicine; NA, not applicable. The full names of the COMs appear in the appendix with their abbreviations on pages 126-128 of this issue of JAOA—The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association.Sources: American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine/American Osteopathic Association, Annual Osteopathic Medical School Questionnaire: 2005-06 Academic Year3 (December 31, 2006).
 *Data are presented as No. (%). Some percentages do not total 100 because of rounding.
 Colleges with provisional accreditation status or preaccreditation status as noted in the appendix. Data are currently unavailable for these COMs.
 Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine-Bradenton, Fla, and Touro University Nevada College of Osteopathic Medicine in Henderson are branch campuses that enrolled their first classes in 2004.
 §Data for New York College of Osteopathic Medicine of New York Institute of Technology in Old Westbury include students in the Accelerated Program for Émigré Physicians.
×